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EASTERN nations stand with Ukraine


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And what is supposed to be so newsworthy of this.  Back in Feb I posted a list of what everyone wants from this war.  You will recall how I said Poland wants to do to Russia good and hard before Russia does to them? They have a 1000 year long blood feud and so when you have one saying shit about the other you can dismiss it fairly easily.  Lithuania is similar but they dream of being a great empire again too and so today they find it in their interest to say the Russians are bad, tomorrow (meaning in future) they'd ally themselves with Russia against Poland.

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Sack "The Buffalo Range's TRUSTED News Source!"

“When a well-packaged web of lies has been sold gradually to the masses over generations, the truth will seem utterly preposterous and its speaker a raving lunatic.” ~ Dresden James

Parler @NYexile

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, Thebowflexbody said:

Your point?

Animated GIF

“There he goes. One of God's own prototypes.

A high-powered mutant of some kind, never even considered for mass production.

Too weird to live, and too rare to die.”

 

Twitter: @HKTheResistance

 

HipKat, on *** other h***, is genuine, unapoli***tically nasty, and w**** his hea** on his ******. jc856

I’ll just forward them to Bridgett. comssvet11

Seek help. soflabillsfan

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Sack "The Buffalo Range's TRUSTED News Source!"

“When a well-packaged web of lies has been sold gradually to the masses over generations, the truth will seem utterly preposterous and its speaker a raving lunatic.” ~ Dresden James

Parler @NYexile

 

 

 

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On 5/11/2022 at 2:52 PM, Herodotus said:

And what is supposed to be so newsworthy of this.  Back in Feb I posted a list of what everyone wants from this war.  You will recall how I said Poland wants to do to Russia good and hard before Russia does to them? They have a 1000 year long blood feud and so when you have one saying shit about the other you can dismiss it fairly easily.  Lithuania is similar but they dream of being a great empire again too and so today they find it in their interest to say the Russians are bad, tomorrow (meaning in future) they'd ally themselves with Russia against Poland.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_joke

 

A "Polish joke" is an English-language ethnic joke deriding Polish people, based on derogatory stereotypes. The "Polish joke" belongs in the category of conditional jokes, whose full understanding requires the audience to have prior knowledge of what a "Polish joke" is. As with all discriminatory jokes, "Polish jokes" depend on the listener's preconceived notions and antipathies.[1]

The relation between the internalized derogatory stereotypes about Polish people, and the persistence of ethnic jokes about them, is not easy to trace, though the "jokes" seem to be understood by many who hear them.[2] Sometimes an offensive term for a Pole, such as "Polack", is used in the joke.

Example:

Q: How many Polacks does it take to change a light bulb?
A: Three – one to hold the bulb, and two to turn the ladder.

HistoryEdit

Some early 20th-century "Polish jokes" may have been told originally before World War II in disputed border regions such as Silesia, suggesting that Polish jokes did not originate in Nazi Germany but rather much earlier as an outgrowth of regional jokes rooted in historical discrimination of Poles in German-ruled areas, at least from the 18th-century Partitions of Poland, and actively pursued from the end of the 19th century by the government-backed German Eastern Marches Society, resulting in social class differences.[3] Nonetheless, these jokes were later fuelled by ethnic slurs disseminated by German warlords and National Socialist propaganda that attempted to justify Nazi crimes against ethnic Poles by representing Poles as dirty and relegating them as inferior on the basis of their not being German.[4][5]

Polish Americans became the subject of derogatory jokes at the time when Polish immigrants moved to America in considerable numbers fleeing mass persecution at home perpetrated under Prussian[6] and Russian rule.[7][8] They took the only jobs available to them, usually requiring physical labor. The same job-related stereotypes persisted even as Polish Americans joined the middle class in the mid 20th century. During the Cold War era, despite the sympathy in the US for Poland being subjected to communism, negative stereotypes about Polish Americans endured, mainly because of Hollywood/TV media involvement.[9][10]

Some Polish jokes were brought to America by German displaced persons fleeing war-torn Europe in the late 1940s.[4] During the political transformations of the Soviet controlled Eastern bloc in the 1980s, the much earlier German anti-Polish sentiment—dating at least to the policies of Otto von Bismarck and the persecution of Poles under the German Empire—was revived in East Germany against Solidarność (Solidarity). Polish jokes became common, reminding some of the spread of such jokes under the Nazis.[11]

According to Christie Davies, American versions of Polish jokes are an unrelated "purely American phenomenon" and do not express the "historical Old World hatreds".[12] Researchers of the Polish American Journal argue instead that Nazi and Soviet propaganda shaped the perception of Poles.[13]

Negative stereotypesEdit

United StatesEdit

Debate continues whether the early Polish jokes brought to states like Wisconsin by German immigrants were directly related to the wave of American jokes of the early 1960s.[3] Since the late 1960s, Polish American organizations made continuous efforts to challenge the negative stereotyping of Polish people once prevalent in the US media. In the 1960s and 70s, television shows like All in the Family, The Tonight Show, and Laugh-In often used jokes perceived by American Poles as demeaning.[10] The Polish jokes heard in the 1970s led the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs to approach the U.S. State Department to complain, a move that ultimately had no effect.[10] The 2010 documentary film Polack by James Kenney explores the source of the Polish joke in America, tracing it through history and into contemporary politics.[14][15] The depiction of Polish Americans in the play Polish Joke by David Ives has resulted in a number of complaints by the Polonia in the United States.[16]

The book Hollywood's War with Poland shows how Hollywood's World War II (and onwards) negative portrayal of Polish people as being "backward", helped condition the American people to see Polish people as having inferior intelligence. The book supports the Polish-American Journal's assertion that Hollywood historically was fertile ground for anti-Polish prejudice, based on Hollywood's left-wing and Soviet sympathies.[17]

...more...

 

 

 

"The Zarqawi PSYOP program is the most successful information campaign to date." ~ Gen. Mark (Killer) Kimmitt

http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/archivos_pdf/911_newpearlharbor.pdf

http://www.cooperativeresearch.org/project.jsp?project=911_project

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