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Watershed moment in NYC: New law allows noncitizens to vote


HipKat
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I cannot begin to understand how this is constitutional

More than 800,000 noncitizens and “Dreamers” in New York City will have access to the ballot box — and could vote in municipal elections as early as next year — after Mayor Eric Adams allowed legislation to automatically become law Sunday.

Opponents have vowed to challenge the new law, which the City Council approved a month ago. Unless a judge halts its implementation, New York City is the first major U.S. city to grant widespread municipal voting rights to noncitizens.

More than a dozen communities across the U.S. already allow noncitizens to cast ballots in local elections, including 11 towns in Maryland and two in Vermont.

Noncitizens still wouldn’t be able to vote for president or members of Congress in federal races, or in the state elections that pick the governor, judges and legislators.

The Board of Elections must now begin drawing an implementation plan by July, including voter registration rules and provisions that would create separate ballots for municipal races to prevent noncitizens from casting ballots in federal and state contests.

It's a watershed moment for the nation's most populous city, where legally documented, voting-age noncitizens comprise nearly one in nine of the city’s 7 million voting-age inhabitants. The movement to win voting rights for noncitizens prevailed after numerous setbacks.

The measure would allow noncitizens who have been lawful permanent residents of the city for at least 30 days, as well as those authorized to work in the U.S., including "Dreamers,” to help select the city’s mayor, city council members, borough presidents, comptroller and public advocate.

“Dreamers” are young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children who would benefit from the never-passed DREAM Act or the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which allows them to remain in the country if they meet certain criteria.

The first elections in which noncitizens would be allowed to vote are in 2023.

“We build a stronger democracy when we include the voices of immigrants,” said former City Councilmember Ydanis Rodriguez, who led the charge to win approval for the legislation.

Rodriguez, who Adams appointed as his transportation commissioner, thanked the mayor for his support and expects a vigorous defense against any legal challenges.

Adams recently cast uncertainty over the legislation when he raised concern about the monthlong residency standard, but later said those concerns did not mean he would veto the bill.

While there was some question whether Adams could stop the bill from becoming law, the 30-day time limit for the mayor to take action expired at the stroke of midnight.

Adams said he looked forward to the law bringing millions more into the democratic process.

“I believe that New Yorkers should have a say in their government, which is why I have and will continue to support this important legislation,” Adams said in a statement released Saturday night. He added that his earlier concerns were put at ease after what he called productive dialogue with colleagues.

Former Mayor Bill de Blasio had similar concerns but did not move to veto the measure before vacating City Hall at the end of the year.

Opponents say the council lacks the authority on its own to grant voting rights to noncitizens and should have first sought action by state lawmakers.

Some states, including Alabama, Arizona, Colorado and Florida, have adopted rules that would preempt any attempts to pass laws like the one in New York City.

 

“There he goes. One of God's own prototypes.

A high-powered mutant of some kind, never even considered for mass production.

Too weird to live, and too rare to die.”

 

Twitter: @HKTheResistance

 

HipKat, on *** other h***, is genuine, unapoli***tically nasty, and w**** his hea** on his ******. jc856

I’ll just forward them to Bridgett. comssvet11

Seek help. soflabillsfan

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And these are the same democrats that just love to talk about democracy.Not only do they allow millions to flout or laws and constitution by opening our borders then turning over hard earned tax payer funds to support their latest voting block of the same illegals, they want to stain our election process as well.

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1 hour ago, HipKat said:

I cannot begin to understand how this is constitutional

cause its local law.  has nothing to do with federal or state law despite what the MAGATs would have you believe

joker-why-so-serious.gif 

The Board of Elections must now begin drawing an implementation plan by July, including voter registration rules and provisions that would create separate ballots for municipal races to prevent noncitizens from casting ballots in federal and state contests

I'm on the fence on this one.  legal non-citizens pay taxes so they should probably have a say in who the fucking dog catcher is.

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26 minutes ago, 212frawk said:

cause its local law.  has nothing to do with federal or state law despite what the MAGATs would have you believe

joker-why-so-serious.gif 

The Board of Elections must now begin drawing an implementation plan by July, including voter registration rules and provisions that would create separate ballots for municipal races to prevent noncitizens from casting ballots in federal and state contests

I'm on the fence on this one.  legal non-citizens pay taxes so they should probably have a say in who the fucking dog catcher is.

My personal opinion at this moment is non-citizens shouldn’t have the “right” to vote. They pay taxes on wages earned here, without being a citizen. They should say thank you. If you want to vote, become a citizen.

my mind could be changed if I heard a good argument why it’s wrong to think that way.

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23 minutes ago, jc856 said:

My personal opinion at this moment is non-citizens shouldn’t have the “right” to vote. They pay taxes on wages earned here, without being a citizen. They should say thank you. If you want to vote, become a citizen.

my mind could be changed if I heard a good argument why it’s wrong to think that way.

I'm willing to give it a chance.  NYC is a shit hole and the immigrants might help influence positive change.  Its highly unlikely, but might be worth trying.  :niterider:

 

 

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55 minutes ago, Woody said:

I'm willing to give it a chance.  NYC is a shit hole and the immigrants might help influence positive change.  Its highly unlikely, but might be worth trying.  :niterider:

NYC is a big Petri dish for experimenting. Why not Bumfuche Illinois first?

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4 hours ago, HipKat said:

I cannot begin to understand how this is constitutional

More than 800,000 noncitizens and “Dreamers” in New York City will have access to the ballot box — and could vote in municipal elections as early as next year — after Mayor Eric Adams allowed legislation to automatically become law Sunday.

Opponents have vowed to challenge the new law, which the City Council approved a month ago. Unless a judge halts its implementation, New York City is the first major U.S. city to grant widespread municipal voting rights to noncitizens.

 

This is what the Democrats, especially  the ones in New York have been working for this for years. And now people are surprised, somehow? Open the borders!!! And they’ve also been working towards giving the felons, that they are putting back on the streets after all the prison closings, the right to vote. They are OK with selling law abiding US citizens down the road if it can get them more votes. And the only reason the Republican politicians are upset about it is because they didn’t think of it first. The two party system at it’s finest. Isn’t it great?

Ed Oliver is my adopt-a-Bill

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5 minutes ago, Nuke said:

This is what the Democrats, especially  the one in New York have been working for this for years. And now people are surprised, somehow? Open the borders!!! And they’ve also been working towards giving the felons, that they are putting back on the streets after all the prison closings, the right to vote. They are OK with selling law abiding US citizens down the road if it can get them more votes. And the only reason the Republican politicians are upset about it is because they didn’t think of it first. The two party system at it’s finest. Isn’t it great?

I guess all you have to “be” anymore, is a citizen of the world. That gives you the right to US taxpayer benefits.

I'm all for helping people, but I guess I don’t have to, they help themselves.

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2 hours ago, 212frawk said:

cause its local law.  has nothing to do with federal or state law despite what the MAGATs would have you believe

joker-why-so-serious.gif 

The Board of Elections must now begin drawing an implementation plan by July, including voter registration rules and provisions that would create separate ballots for municipal races to prevent noncitizens from casting ballots in federal and state contests

I'm on the fence on this one.  legal non-citizens pay taxes so they should probably have a say in who the fucking dog catcher is.

Do you believe this is the end game? Local issues and nothing more? I’m with JC on this. You want to vote, even on just local things,  become a citizen. If you can vote, what incentive is there to become a citizen. Can I go to Mexico City and vote for the mayor? Somehow doesn’t seem right.

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1 hour ago, Nuke said:

Open the borders

lol, talk about conflating the issue MAGAT style.....

Its local elections in a jurisdiction where the legal noncitizen pays taxes and in every other way is like the citizen sitting next to them on the subway.  

What problem does this create?

 

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51 minutes ago, Nuke said:

Do you believe this is the end game? Local issues and nothing more? I’m with JC on this. You want to vote, even on just local things,  become a citizen. If you can vote, what incentive is there to become a citizen. Can I go to Mexico City and vote for the mayor? Somehow doesn’t seem right.

I’m not a “super patriot” by any means, but what’s the sense of designing a country with borders that are defended, making laws and regulations to live by, 

and then disregard them? 
 

there’s one thing the left says that I agree with. They say, “If the US wasn’t starting shit in other countries leading to refugees and people displacement, maybe there wouldn’t be so many people trying to get HERE”.

100% agree with that. 

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7 minutes ago, 212frawk said:

lol, talk about conflating the issue MAGAT style.....

Its local elections in a jurisdiction where the legal noncitizen pays taxes and in every other way is like the citizen sitting next to them on the subway.  

What problem does this create?

Should a Mexican citizen be able to come up here and vote for the mayor of NYC? Can I go there and vote for the mayor of Mexico City? Nope. Keep drinking the Kool-aid Frawk

Ed Oliver is my adopt-a-Bill

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On the other forum I'm on, the dumb Democrats keep trying to say t hat the Constitution doesn't require people to be citizens to vote, when it actually does.

 

 

Who Can and Can’t Vote in U.S. Elections

You must be a U.S. citizen to vote in federal, state, or local elections. 

Who Can Vote?

You can vote in U.S. elections if you:

  • Are a U.S. citizen

  • Meet your state’s residency requirements

  • Are 18 years old on or before Election Day

    • In almost every state, you can register to vote before you turn 18 if you will be 18 by Election Day. 

  • Are registered to vote by your state’s voter registration deadline. North Dakota does not require voter registration.

 

“There he goes. One of God's own prototypes.

A high-powered mutant of some kind, never even considered for mass production.

Too weird to live, and too rare to die.”

 

Twitter: @HKTheResistance

 

HipKat, on *** other h***, is genuine, unapoli***tically nasty, and w**** his hea** on his ******. jc856

I’ll just forward them to Bridgett. comssvet11

Seek help. soflabillsfan

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4 hours ago, 212frawk said:

cause its local law.  has nothing to do with federal or state law despite what the MAGATs would have you believe

Local elections require citizenship, too

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“There he goes. One of God's own prototypes.

A high-powered mutant of some kind, never even considered for mass production.

Too weird to live, and too rare to die.”

 

Twitter: @HKTheResistance

 

HipKat, on *** other h***, is genuine, unapoli***tically nasty, and w**** his hea** on his ******. jc856

I’ll just forward them to Bridgett. comssvet11

Seek help. soflabillsfan

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16 hours ago, Nuke said:

Should a Mexican citizen be able to come up here and vote for the mayor of NYC? Can I go there and vote for the mayor of Mexico City? Nope. Keep drinking the Kool-aid Frawk

these are people legally here paying taxes just like you.  I think they should have a say in local politics.  Again, what problem is this creating and dont give me the BS slippery slope argument Because this cannot happen in federal and state elections.

 

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21 minutes ago, 212frawk said:

these are people legally here paying taxes just like you.  I think they should have a say in local politics.  Again, what problem is this creating and dont give me the BS slippery slope argument Because this cannot happen in federal and state elections.

I’m talking about voting for the mayor. That’s not federal or state. You think that Mexican citizens working in NYC should have as much of a vote on the mayor as a city resident. Now, if my company gets a job in NYC (which they have in the past) and I go down and work there for a couple months, do I get a vote for who the mayor is?

Ed Oliver is my adopt-a-Bill

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56 minutes ago, Nuke said:

I’m talking about voting for the mayor. That’s not federal or state. You think that Mexican citizens working in NYC should have as much of a vote on the mayor as a city resident. Now, if my company gets a job in NYC (which they have in the past) and I go down and work there for a couple months, do I get a vote for who the mayor is?

still waiting for you to give a good example of what problem this creates, other than you seem paranoid about mexicans.  How come a legal, tax paying brit isnt your example?

Shouldnt the legal people that pay taxes have a say in who influences their local lives?  What's the dif between holding a green card and a being an admitted citizen other than some stupid paperwork?  

 

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The problem could be mass bussing of immigrants to swing an election.  BTW, if everyone thought that these voters would vote 50-50 and would cancel themselves - NO POLITICIAN would be encouraging this. 

Also, I have to reread the constitution.   I know that every state is required to have a 'Republican form of government" and for the Presidency the state legislature determines the method of selecting the electors. 

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NYC Mayor Adams takes a big step to cheapening American citizenship

 

On January 1, New York City’s new mayor, Eric Adams, was unsure about whether it was a good idea to sign off on a bill the NYC council passed in December allowing green card holders the right to vote in local elections. A week passed, though, and Adams’ doubts diminished so much that he’s now on board with the plan. Not only will the new policy delete the value of citizenship in New York City, but it’s an almost inevitable step towards massive federal election fraud, with non-citizens (800,000 in NYC alone) affecting those elections.

The New York City council passed the “Our City, Our Vote” measure in December. It was such a radical thing to do that lots of people, including constitutional experts and even former mayor Bill de Blasio himself, expressed concern. Under the bill, around 800,000 green card holders and recipients of deferred action, will get to vote in municipal elections.

The premise is that, because these people live in the city, they should have a say in how it’s run. But of course, one can say that about anybody living both legally or illegally anywhere, whether a city, state, or country. And indeed, the identical argument applies to letting such people vote for the president because his acts affect them. Heck, some people have argued that everyone in the world should have a say in American presidential elections because America is so powerful that, when it sneezes, everyone on earth grabs for a tissue.

Arguing this principle, of course, renders citizenship meaningless. If citizenship is just a matter of who pays sales taxes, then people passing through town on a weekend have suddenly earned a say in local politics. And every tourist in America, at the very least, should get the vote.

 

Citizenship is about more than money and proximity to the polling booth. Instead, citizenship means someone raised to have an affinity for the country and her institutions and, one hopes, to respect the country and want her to continue in good health. This is an incredibly valuable concept, which is tied to a special right and privilege. Leftists, of course, hate that fact.

However, the bigger, more immediate problem is that allowing non-citizens to vote paves the way to election fraud. Does anyone seriously believe that, if a green card holder shows up at his local voting place in November 2024, there isn’t an extremely good chance that he will receive, not the limited municipal election ballot but, instead, the full municipal, state, and federal election ballot? After all, the election fraud battle is pretty much over once these non-citizens have the right to walk through the door and are handed a ballot.

As for Adams, why did he cave? Well, he wasn’t clear about that:

“I believe that New Yorkers should have a say in their government, which is why I have and will continue to support this important legislation,” Adams said in a statement Saturday.

“While I initially had some concerns about one aspect of the bill, I had a productive dialogue with my colleagues in government that put those concerns at ease. I believe allowing the legislation to be enacted is by far the best choice, and look forward to bringing millions more into the democratic process,” the Democrat continued.

So far, between his support for a Manhattan District Attorney who vows not to follow the law, his appointing his brother to a $250,000 a year job as the Deputy NYPD Commissioner, and his support for letting practically anyone living in New York City vote, Eric Adams is proving to be just another Bill de Blasio. As always, my sympathy goes to those who voted against him. As for the rest of New Yorkers, the ones who affirmatively voted for Adams or those who couldn’t be bothered to vote at all, they deserve what’s coming their way.

 

 

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13 minutes ago, SackMan518 said:

NYC Mayor Adams takes a big step to cheapening American citizenship

On January 1, New York City’s new mayor, Eric Adams, was unsure about whether it was a good idea to sign off on a bill the NYC council passed in December allowing green card holders the right to vote in local elections. A week passed, though, and Adams’ doubts diminished so much that he’s now on board with the plan. Not only will the new policy delete the value of citizenship in New York City, but it’s an almost inevitable step towards massive federal election fraud, with non-citizens (800,000 in NYC alone) affecting those elections.

The New York City council passed the “Our City, Our Vote” measure in December. It was such a radical thing to do that lots of people, including constitutional experts and even former mayor Bill de Blasio himself, expressed concern. Under the bill, around 800,000 green card holders and recipients of deferred action, will get to vote in municipal elections.

The premise is that, because these people live in the city, they should have a say in how it’s run. But of course, one can say that about anybody living both legally or illegally anywhere, whether a city, state, or country. And indeed, the identical argument applies to letting such people vote for the president because his acts affect them. Heck, some people have argued that everyone in the world should have a say in American presidential elections because America is so powerful that, when it sneezes, everyone on earth grabs for a tissue.

Arguing this principle, of course, renders citizenship meaningless. If citizenship is just a matter of who pays sales taxes, then people passing through town on a weekend have suddenly earned a say in local politics. And every tourist in America, at the very least, should get the vote.

Citizenship is about more than money and proximity to the polling booth. Instead, citizenship means someone raised to have an affinity for the country and her institutions and, one hopes, to respect the country and want her to continue in good health. This is an incredibly valuable concept, which is tied to a special right and privilege. Leftists, of course, hate that fact.

However, the bigger, more immediate problem is that allowing non-citizens to vote paves the way to election fraud. Does anyone seriously believe that, if a green card holder shows up at his local voting place in November 2024, there isn’t an extremely good chance that he will receive, not the limited municipal election ballot but, instead, the full municipal, state, and federal election ballot? After all, the election fraud battle is pretty much over once these non-citizens have the right to walk through the door and are handed a ballot.

As for Adams, why did he cave? Well, he wasn’t clear about that:

“I believe that New Yorkers should have a say in their government, which is why I have and will continue to support this important legislation,” Adams said in a statement Saturday.

“While I initially had some concerns about one aspect of the bill, I had a productive dialogue with my colleagues in government that put those concerns at ease. I believe allowing the legislation to be enacted is by far the best choice, and look forward to bringing millions more into the democratic process,” the Democrat continued.

So far, between his support for a Manhattan District Attorney who vows not to follow the law, his appointing his brother to a $250,000 a year job as the Deputy NYPD Commissioner, and his support for letting practically anyone living in New York City vote, Eric Adams is proving to be just another Bill de Blasio. As always, my sympathy goes to those who voted against him. As for the rest of New Yorkers, the ones who affirmatively voted for Adams or those who couldn’t be bothered to vote at all, they deserve what’s coming their way.

Excellent point.   I call it incrementallism.

This could set a precedent where all people residing in an area should have a say in those elections that affect them.   This would include federal elections.   Obviously. 

 

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2 hours ago, 212frawk said:

still waiting for you to give a good example of what problem this creates, other than you seem paranoid about mexicans.  How come a legal, tax paying brit isnt your example?

Shouldnt the legal people that pay taxes have a say in who influences their local lives?  What's the dif between holding a green card and a being an admitted citizen other than some stupid paperwork?  

There is no difference between an immigrant from Europe and one from Mexico. So you got me there. Still don’t think they should be able to vote for mayor of a major US city. You didn’t answer my question about me working down there. Say my company has a 6 month job down there. I’m renting a hotel room or even an apartment. Can I just go and vote for mayor of NYC?

Ed Oliver is my adopt-a-Bill

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Just now, Nuke said:

There is no difference between an immigrant from Europe and one from Mexico. So you got me there. Still don’t think they should be able to vote for mayor of a major US city. You didn’t answer my question about me working down there. Say my company has a 6 month job down there. I’m renting a hotel room or even an apartment. Can I just go and vote for mayor of NYC?

That's the wrong analogy, since you would be there on a visa, not on their equivalent of a green card that gives a foreign national the right to stay here forever.  A green card holder is citizenship-lite.  Most of the same privileges as a citizen except to vote in state and national elections.  

So, is there a problem created or you object just because..... 

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