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HipKat

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Everything posted by HipKat

  1. Because he uses it on every post
  2. W:ET is the multiplayer game that came after RTOC, which I also played for many years
  3. The NFL’s Week 12 Sunday slate featured monster performances: The Raiders’ Josh Jacobs and the Eagles’ Jalen Hurts both had 300-yard days and we saw last-second heroics from quarterbacks Trevor Lawrence and Justin Herbert, Browns teammates David Njoku and Nick Chubb, and much more. Sunday marked the first time in NFL history since the two-point conversion was implemented in 1994 that multiple games were decided by two-point conversions scored in the final two minutes of play. And the Jaguars and Chargers became only the third and fourth teams since 1994 to score game-winning two-point conversions in the final 15 seconds of the fourth quarter. They joined the 2018 Chargers (four seconds left in Week 15) and 2002 Vikings (five seconds remaining in Week 15) in accomplishing the feat. Meanwhile, the playoff picture continued to take shape. Some teams strengthened commanding leads in their divisions and conference races while others continued to try to force their way into the picture. Hope has started to fade for others. Here’s a game-by-game, team-by-team look at some of the biggest lessons from the Week 12 action. Eagles 40, Packers 33 Philadelphia: A well-deserved game ball for center Jason Kelce, leader of an Eagles offensive line that paved the way for 363 rushing yards — the most in franchise history in 73 years. Meanwhile, Hurts delivered another MVP-worthy performance, rushing for a season-high 157 yards and passing for two touchdowns and another 153 yards as the Eagles scored their season high in points and improved to a league-best 10-1. The MVP race is shaping up to be a showdown between Hurts, Patrick Mahomes, Tua Tagovailoa and Josh Allen. Considering the dramatic growth Hurts has displayed this season, and his team’s current position as the No. 1 seed throughout the playoffs, you can make the argument that he deserves the nod. Green Bay: Aaron Rodgers (already nursing a broken thumb) couldn’t finish the game because of a rib injury, and now Matt LaFleur might have a decision to make. At 4-8 and with Rodgers ailing, is it time to turn to Jordan Love? A third-year pro, Love is regarded as the future, but largely remains an unknown commodity. He did look sharp in relief of Rodgers Sunday. Chargers 25, Cardinals 24 Los Angeles: Brandon Staley doesn’t do overtime. Having blown fourth-quarter leads in each of the two previous weeks, the coach went for the win, and Justin Herbert delivered, drilling an open Gerald Everett for the deciding two-point conversion with 15 seconds left. Nice way to rebound after a heartbreaking loss to the Chiefs in Week 11. Arizona: Kliff Kingsbury and Kyler Murray, on the other hand, do not do clutch. After taking a 24-17 lead with 13:31 left, Kingsbury’s offense gained only 16 yards on its final three possessions. The Cardinals lost their fourth game in the last five outings and dropped to 4-8. Browns 23, Buccaneers 17 (OT) Cleveland: Jacoby Brissett has done an admirable job filling in for the soon-to-be reinstated Deshaun Watson. Sunday, Brissett went out as interim starter with a bang, directing a game-winning drive, and outduking his former Patriots teammate Tom Brady in overtime. During this 11-game stretch, Brissett has posted a career-best completion percentage (64.3) and passer rating (90.7) while recording 12 touchdown passes and six interceptions. In the eyes of the Browns, Brissett has done everything asked of him. Now, at 4-7 with six games left, they’ll see if Watson can lead them on a late playoff push. Tampa Bay: With the loss, the Buccaneers dropped below .500. The good news for them: Although 5-6, they still lead the NFC South, whose other three teams also own losing records. The most concerning development of the game is the prognosis of top offensive lineman Tristan Wirfs, who was carted off in overtime with a left leg injury. Bengals 20, Titans 16 Cincinnati: No Ja’Marr Chase? No Joe Mixon? No problem. For a second straight week, the Bengals showed off their offensive depth, and they capitalized on an impressive performance by a defense that bottled up Derrick Henry for just 38 rushing yards and a 2.2-yard average (his second-lowest of the season in both categories). Tennessee: Henry did post a team-high 79 receiving yards on three catches, and Ryan Tannehill did spread the ball around to seven different pass-catchers. But nine times out of 10, the Titans, as currently constructed, will come up short against elite teams when they can’t run the ball. Dolphins 30, Texans 15 Miami: To no surprise, the Texans were no match for the Dolphins. But offensive line depth could be an issue for Miami going forward. From the time left tackle Terron Armstead left with a pectoral injury with 1:06 left in the second quarter until 3:18 remained in the third quarter, Tagovailoa was sacked four times. Mike McDaniel then wisely pulled his quarterback while up 30-0 rather than subject him to further risk of injury. But to make matters worse, right tackle Austin Jackson also left the game early with an ankle injury. The Dolphins improved to 8-3 but wait anxiously on the status of their bookends. Houston: Davis Mills … Kyle Allen … Does it really matter? Jaguars 28, Ravens 27 Jacksonville: The Jaguars desperately need Trevor Lawrence (rather pedestrian through the first 27 games of his career) to start delivering some game-changing plays. Sunday, the top pick of the 2021 draft delivered the most clutch performance of his career, capping a 321-yard, three-TD day by directing a 10-play, 75-yard game-winning drive that culminated with a touchdown pass and successful two-point conversion. Baltimore: Justin Tucker just narrowly missed a potential NFL-record 67-yard field goal as time expired. But it should never have come down to that — not if the Ravens view themselves as contenders. Contenders don’t struggle in the red zone (2-for-5) and collapse late on defense as Baltimore did. Jets 31, Bears 10 New York: With a finger on the pulse of the locker room, Robert Saleh benched supposed franchise quarterback Zach Wilson after his horrendous performance against the Patriots. Replacement Mike White rewarded Saleh by leading the Jets (7-4) to victory while accomplishing a couple things Wilson has yet to do in his young career: White recorded a three-touchdown, zero-turnover game with a passer rating of 149.3. Chicago: The Bears may be on a five-game losing streak, but Justin Fields’ worth is clear even when he’s out with injury. An offense that averaged 29.6 points a game on the back of their young quarterback mustered only 10 points with Trevor Siemian filling in. Commanders 19, Falcons 13 Washington: A goal-line stand that climaxed with a Kendall Fuller interception with 1:03 left gave the Fighting Heinickies their third straight victory, and sixth in their last seven. That means every NFC East team has at least seven victories, and that Washington — which opened the year 1-4 — has a chance to overtake the Giants next week. But the most remarkable story of the year continues to be rookie running back Brian Robinson Jr. Just three months after would-be carjackers shot him in the knee twice, the Alabama product recorded the first 100-yard rushing performance of his young career and also scored on a receiving touchdown. Atlanta: The Falcons came up short in this throwback game after getting outrushed 176-167. An inability to get off the field in the second half (Washington held the ball for 20 of the 30 minutes) and to capitalize in the red zone proved fatal for Arthur Smith, whose defense ranks third-worst in the league on third downs. Panthers 23, Broncos 10 Carolina: Sam Darnold got his turn on the Panthers’ quarterback carousel and turned in a fairly solid performance (11-for-19, 164 yards, rushing touchdown, passing touchdown, no turnovers). That was despite playing in his first regular-season game since the 2021 finale and getting outplayed by Baker Mayfield in the preseason. With five games left, Darnold will look to salvage his career by either solidifying his position with Carolina for next season, or by auditioning for other teams next year. Denver: Russell Wilson (19-for-35 for a measly 142 yards and a fumble) couldn’t even celebrate his 300th career touchdown pass because he got outplayed by Darnold and saw his Broncos lose their third straight game and seventh of their last eight. Falling to an interim head coach in Steve Wilks was also a bad look for Nathaniel Hackett, who continues to sorely disappoint. Raiders 40, Seahawks 34 (OT) Las Vegas: Josh Jacobs, grown man: 229 yards, two touchdowns — including the 86-yard game-winner in overtime — on 39 carries and six catches for 74 yards. Jacobs became only the sixth player in NFL history to record at least 300 scrimmage yards and multiple scrimmage touchdowns in a single game. And as far as the Raiders go: After starting the season 2-7, Josh McDaniels’ team has won two in a row in overtime by sticking with a recipe of balance (295 yards passing, 283 rushing against Seattle). Seattle: You have to win in the trenches, and you have to get off the field on third downs. The Seahawks defense did neither, and this one will sting a while. Losers of two straight, Seattle dropped to 6-5 while divisional foe San Francisco improved to 7-4. 49ers 13, Saints 0 San Francisco: The 49ers seemed a bit off offensively, but their defense was on point, recording two takeaways, denying the Saints on seven of 11 third downs and recording their first shutout since 2019. Winners of four straight, the 49ers now lead the NFC West. New Orleans: The Saints had their chances, but two Alvin Kamara fumbles (including one at the goal line), an 0-2 showing in the red zone and a missed field goal will haunt them. Shut out for the first time since 2001, New Orleans fell to 4-8. The Saints aren’t out of it because NFC South leader Tampa Bay is 5-7. But prospects for a turnaround appear rather bleak. Chiefs 26, Rams 10 Kansas City: So much for the potential Super Bowl preview the schedule makers envisioned in the spring. Mahomes vs. Bryce Perkins isn’t a fair fight. The Chiefs took care of business, won their fifth straight and improved to 9-2. Los Angeles: Hats off to Raheem Morris’ defense for denying Mahomes on four of five trips inside the red zone. But the battered Rams don’t have enough offensively to go toe-to-toe with the Chiefs.
  4. I still play Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory every day
  5. HipKat

    Shocking

    Ummm probably not what I said since it makes no sense
  6. HipKat

    Shocking

    Nope, because I never said that getting rid of gender would be bad. You love to put words in people's mouths.
  7. The Chiefs stomped the defending Super Bowl-champion Rams in the late-afternoon window Sunday as Patrick Mahomes had another MVP-level performance and the K.C. defense held L.A. under 200 yards of offense. Meanwhile, the 49ers shut out the Saints, the Raiders shocked the Seahawks in overtime and the Chargers beat the Cardinals on a gutsy two-point conversion with 15 seconds remaining. Earlier in the day, we got more wins in the AFC East, including a breakout performance from a replacement quarterback. We got a huge performance from Trevor Lawrence in a comeback win over the Ravens. We got a big hat, a nearly nude mascot and skunks in the stands in Cleveland. What else did we see during — and learn from — Sunday’s NFL slate? We asked The Athletic’s Tim Graham, Jeff Howe and Kalyn Kahler to weigh in on the action. As we mentioned, Kansas City throttled L.A. 26-10. Are the Chiefs the total package, or are there a couple of teams in the AFC that can challenge them in the postseason? Graham: As was the case last year, the Chiefs lost at Arrowhead Stadium to the Bills but then continued to get better. Mahomes is on a heater, with the Chiefs posting consecutive wins over the 49ers (first place, NFC West), Titans (first place, AFC South), Jaguars, Chargers and Rams. Buffalo and Josh Allen, meanwhile, have struggled with consistency since that Week 6 victory in K.C. With the AFC West not turning into the gauntlet many anticipated and the AFC East being more competitive than expected, the Chiefs are sterling and have the cleanest look at the conference’s top seed entering December. Although their next three games are on the road, they should collect at least two wins at Cincinnati, Denver and Houston. Howe: The Chiefs certainly look like the best team in the league right now, and that has been the case for most of the season. But they aren’t out of reach by any stretch of the imagination. The Dolphins and Bills are right there, and the Bengals, Titans and Ravens are capable of beating anyone. And while I don’t see the Chargers, Jets or Patriots stringing together a playoff run, at least one of them will be in the dance and won’t be an easy out. I’m not trying to hedge by naming more than half of the AFC. I genuinely believe there’s enough firepower on these teams to make it a wide-open field. Kahler: Yeah, I’m not going to say the Chiefs are unbeatable. The Bills already had their number earlier this season and can definitely challenge them again in the postseason — in a rematch I think every NFL fan would love to see. We say this every week, but the AFC really is stacked, and as Jeff points out, the Titans and Ravens might be the best-coached teams in the league, meaning they can hang with (and beat) anybody. With the 49ers shutting out the Saints and the Seahawks falling to Josh Jacobs and the Raiders, San Francisco has a one-game lead in the NFC West. Is either of these teams a serious contender in the NFC? Graham: I thought all the gushing over San Francisco following last Monday night’s victory over Arizona was over the top because Kliff Kingsbury is clinging to his job. But allowing only 40 points total the past four weeks is remarkable regardless of the opposition. My skepticism about the 49ers revolves around their bad early losses to the Bears, Broncos and Falcons. Then they were vaporized by the Chiefs. Granted, the Christian McCaffrey trade gives Kyle Shanahan a hellacious option, and Jimmy Garoppolo has stood tall in that awkward “next man up” role. But the conference’s road to the Super Bowl goes through the NFC East, with the Vikings best positioned to force a detour. Howe: It didn’t look like it Sunday, but the 49ers might be the best team in the NFC by playoff time. They have the highest ceiling along with the Cowboys and Eagles. All three teams are really, really good on both sides of the ball. Kahler: The Niners are legit, and they seem to be improving every week. Working things out with Jimmy G. was such a smart move, and this really might be the year he gets his ring. Garoppolo’s story arc this season is something I don’t think we’ve seen before in the NFL. I mean, this dude was literally not practicing with his team or attending meetings during training camp. He was not part of the franchise’s plans then, but where would they be now without him? The Niners and Jimmy are one of the league’s most interesting storylines. Between the Jets bashing the Bears behind a banner day from quarterback Mike White, the Dolphins holding on to top the Texans and the Bills’ win on Thanksgiving, the AFC East race is shaping up to be one of the NFL’s most exciting. Is New York or Miami the bigger threat to Buffalo? Graham: As terrific as Mike White looked Sunday, he did it against the Bears, who lost their eighth game in nine tries Sunday. The Jets, despite Robert Saleh’s solid defense, have deeper issues than a fifth-round draft pick making his fourth NFL start can fix. The Dolphins haven’t benched a healthy quarterback this year, as Tua Tagovailoa continues to bolster his MVP case every week. The Dolphins face a grueling schedule down the stretch with their next three games (two of which are on the West Coast) and four of their next five on the road, including at Buffalo and at New England. If Mike McDaniel can survive that stretch, he could win not only the AFC East but also Coach of the Year. Howe: The Dolphins aren’t just a threat to the Bills. They’re a threat to everyone. They’ve already beaten the Bills, Ravens and Patriots, and they’re 8-0 when Tagovailoa has been healthy. Tagovailoa is an MVP candidate, and Tyreek Hill is in the mix for Offensive Player of the Year. As Tim said, McDaniel is in the conversation for Coach of the Year. And though their defense hasn’t been as good as it was over the past couple of years under Brian Flores, it’s a group with talent. The Dolphins are a legitimately dangerous team that should be fun to watch in the playoffs. Kahler: I’ll pick the Jets here to be a little contrarian. As expected, Mike White proved Sunday that Zach Wilson was the Jets’ biggest issue as he threw for 315 yards, which is more than Wilson’s last two games combined. Teams have made the postseason with less at quarterback, and the Dolphins defense worries me as we approach the final third of the season. Miami’s defense allows 24.1 points per game and New York’s allows a full touchdown less at 17.1. Taylor Heinicke and the Commanders topped the Falcons for their sixth win in seven games. They may be in last place in the competitive NFC East, but how would you gauge their playoff chances? Graham: They are surging and amazingly delivered the Eagles’ first loss a couple of weeks ago, but the Commanders’ other five victories during this stretch came against teams that are a combined 17-38-2. They won’t catch the Eagles for the division crown but are 1.5 games behind the second-place Cowboys with a rematch coming up in the regular-season finale. They’re just half a game behind the Giants, whom the Commanders will face in their next two games (with a bye in between). Washington’s fate lies ahead, but I have no faith it will navigate December and early January well enough to leapfrog the wild-card contenders in their path. Howe: They’ve absolutely got a chance because they don’t need help from anyone else. With their next two games against the Giants, it’s right there in front of them. However, both the Commanders and Giants — who are starting to head in the wrong direction — have really difficult schedules down the stretch. Washington also plays the 49ers, Browns and Cowboys, and the Giants have the Eagles (twice), Vikings and Colts. The Giants, Commanders and either the 49ers or Seahawks (whoever finishes second in the NFC West) will battle for the final two playoff spots. Kahler: OK, this is weird. The Commanders will play the Giants in their next two games, Week 13 and Week 15, so those will be crucial to overcoming New York in the division and giving themselves a chance. They are a half-game behind the Giants, who have lost two straight. I’m with Tim, though. This is fun to see Heinicke be something other than Carson Wentz (just like Mike White isn’t Zach Wilson), but I don’t think it’ll be enough in the end. Who stood out to you as having the most impressive individual performance from the early slate of games? Graham: Rookie tailback Brian Robinson continues his sensational return from being shot twice during an attempted carjacking three months ago. He ran 18 times for a career-high 105 yards and added two catches for 20 yards and a touchdown in Washington’s victory over Atlanta. But he never looked better than when he sported his “big hat” in the Commanders’ locker room. This fella was not all hat Sunday. He had the cattle. Howe: Trevor Lawrence delivered an early career-defining moment to lead the Jaguars’ 28-27 comeback victory against the Ravens. He led three consecutive scoring drives to erase a 19-10 deficit and close the game, and Lawrence was 15-of-19 for 173 yards, two touchdowns and a two-point conversion during that stretch. He also completed passes for three third-down conversions and two fourth-down conversions over the last three possessions. His two-pointer was an elite throw to Zay Jones. Another reason this was so pivotal? Lawrence and the offense had the ball late in the fourth quarter with a chance to tie or take the lead in six of Jacksonville’s losses this season, and they failed to score each time. It’s hard for a young group to learn how to win in these situations, and Lawrence finally got over the hump. Kahler: Mike White. I’m sorry I’m going through a Mike White phase, and it’s probably simply because he isn’t Zach Wilson. This same phenomenon happened last year when White upset the Bengals in his first start in relief of Wilson. He instantly opened up the Jets’ passing attack and made it clear Wilson is the one holding back the offense. Beating the Bears isn’t quite as big as upsetting the Bengals, but White injected so much energy into an offense that sorely needed it. Which was the most alarming aspect of the day: the outfit worn by the Jaguars mascot, the skunk in the stands in Cleveland or the Broncos offense under Russell Wilson? Graham: Can what we see from Nathaniel Hackett, Russell Wilson and the Broncos even be considered alarming anymore? We see it every week — and, to make matters worse, an obnoxious number of the subpar performances are on national television. That suggests how much the football world looked forward to seeing Denver resurrect its fortunes, but the more I see of Hackett’s offense, the more it resembles Jaxson de Ville’s getup: naked and regrettable (see the tweet below). I don’t know if Hackett can survive the season. The Broncos have invested far more in Wilson, and coaches don’t carry salary-cap baggage. Howe: It’s no coincidence the Jaguars came back to win that game after the mascot put on some damn clothes. But maybe now we should live in fear that he’ll believe his half-naked first half was good luck and he’ll do it again. At least you can avert your eyes from that situation, though. You know what’ll ruin your day? A skunk. Browns fans have bought far too many QB jerseys to throw another one away from a skunk attack. Kahler: It was clearly the Broncos offense, which averages an NFL-worst 14.7 points per game. I’ve seen quite enough, and I’d be shocked if Hackett isn’t one and done in Denver. Did you catch that delay of game on fourth-and-goal Sunday? For your sake, I hope not.
  8. HipKat

    Shocking

    No, I don't, actually
  9. HipKat

    Shocking

    You're so fucking naive, it's pathetic. There is no world of rainbows and fairies, princess.
  10. HipKat

    Shocking

    Said no one ever, mental case. You seriously have brain damage. I guess a lack of sexual feelings does that. Go get laid, bruh.
  11. Blacks killed by blacks in a criminal situations is not the same as a well-trained and armed Law-enforcement official choking out a dude who's cuffed and restrained with his knee for 11 minutes while everyone around calls for him to let him up because they guy is fucking dying
  12. HipKat

    Shocking

    My kids were never allowed to go to Hooters and Tilted Kilt lasted here for a blink before they shut down, but I wouldn't have taken them there, either. Either way, those are not men cosplaying as women to satisfy a need for arousal and it's a public eatery, not a confined space in a library with all eyes on the protagonist
  13. HipKat

    Shocking

    That's your favorite word, not mine
  14. Yeah, apparently a 1-day jump to him is a long lasting Economic spike
  15. They're similar. The Anorexic with a splash of Bulimia look
  16. The Buffalo Sabres placed Riley Sheahan on unconditional waivers Sunday with the plan to terminate his contract. Sheahan, who turns 31 next month, appeared in just two games for the Sabres this season and was a minus-2 with four penalty minutes. He had three assists in six games with the Rochester Americans. When the Sabres were in Montreal last week and made the decision to reassign Sheahan to Rochester again, Sheahan approached the team about finding a solution that better suited him. “He’s been going through a lot of reflecting and thinking about his own career and past,” Sabres general manager Kevyn Adams said. “He talked to me the next day and said, ‘I had a little bit of time, I’m not sure I’m comfortable at this point reporting to Rochester.’ Honestly, this is why we try to do things the right way and build relationships with every player, so that we can have honest conversations.” When the Sabres originally signed Sheahan over the summer, they explained to him the role they envisioned for him. They viewed him as a player who could provide depth and compete for a spot on the bottom of the NHL roster but also someone who could bring needed experience to Rochester. Sheahan, who spent time in both the AHL and NHL as a member of the Kraken organization last year, was willing to bet on his ability to carve out a consistent role in Buffalo. But even through the first couple of months of the season, the back and forth became too much. Adams met with him when the team got back to Buffalo last Wednesday, had a chat with him on Thanksgiving and another meeting on Saturday. He wanted to give Sheahan time to weigh all of his options and make sure he wasn’t making an emotional decision. Sheahan and his wife had their first child last year, and at this stage in his career, a more stable situation makes more sense. “I think he’s at the point in his career where he’s self-evaluating and being very honest with himself and realizing what’s going on right now is exactly where he sees his career,” Adams said. “That’s not an easy spot to be.” Adams didn’t want to comment on what might be next for Sheahan, who had 17 points in the NHL last season. He could have options in other leagues. He also hosts a podcast called “Speak Your Mind,” which aims to normalize conversations around mental health in sports. A first-round pick in 2010, Sheahan has spent parts of 10 seasons in the NHL. In the last five years, he’s been part of six different NHL organizations and changed teams seven times. “I love that he was confident enough to sit with me and express himself and what’s on his mind,” Adams said. “I respect that.” Quick hits 1. The Sabres were back on the ice practicing Sunday, and Don Granato said Rasmus Asplund will be healthy enough to re-enter the lineup when the team plays the Tampa Bay Lightning on Monday. This is the healthiest lineup the Sabres have had since the beginning of the season with only defenseman Jacob Bryson and goaltender Eric Comrie on the injured list. 2. Casey Mittelstadt and Victor Olofsson showed a positive sign on five-on-five against the Devils. Mittelstadt won a foot race to get to the outside and delivered a perfect backhand pass to Olofsson, who picked a spot and scored from the slot. It’s something Granato has wanted to see more of from that line. While Olofsson has 11 goals this season, three have come against an empty net and three have come on the power play. Mittelstadt has just one goal and two assists at five-on-five this season. Friday was the first time Olofsson was on the ice for a five-on-five goal since Nov. 4. “They need to get off the perimeter and be inside more,” Granato said. “That’s much less a willingness and more of a better understanding in my opinion. I think they’re willing to do it, but it’s timing. The perimeter is not a bad thing. You can use it to lure coverage out, which, most goals are scored that way. Coverage is spread out and then they attack the inside after that. When teams hunker back, not a lot of goals are scored when they put three or four back in the slot and just stand there. It’s getting them out and beating them back to the inside. That foot race did that. They won the inside ice through effort and determination. That’s an area to even generate more chances for them because they aren’t generating enough chances, let alone goals. That’s what they have to focus on.” 3. Granato noted that Mattias Samuelsson succumbed to fatigue a bit against the Devils. After not playing for a month, Samuelsson played three games in four nights. Friday was also a late start. “He just looked exhausted,” Granato said. “He looked like he was worn out the other night. He tripped a few times, one was a goal. That’s just uncharacteristic. He had a tough night and I do believe it was coming off a long injury and playing three in four was the biggest challenge.” The Sabres didn’t practice Saturday and were back on the ice Sunday. Two days without a game should help Samuelsson be ready for a tough assignment with Nikita Kucherov and the Lightning coming to town. “They do love a challenge,” Granato said of Samuelsson and Rasmus Dahlin drawing tough assignments against top teams. “I hope it’s getting to a point sooner rather than later where it’s not an extra excitement for them that they just say whoever you put us against, we know what to do and how to do it and we’re going to play.” 4. After some shuffling and injuries early in the season, Granato seems to be settling on a lineup he likes. With Tage Thompson, Jeff Skinner and Alex Tuch as the top line, Buffalo had been searching for secondary scoring. They’re getting it with Dylan Cozens centering fellow youngsters JJ Peterka and Jack Quinn. Cozens said he told his new linemates, who are both younger than the 21-year-old Cozens, they have a chance to build some crazy chemistry and play together for 10 or 15 years. Granato is a bit more present-minded but shares the enthusiasm about having three high-upside players growing together early in their NHL careers. He noted that Quinn needed time early in the season to find his confidence and be more consistent in winning puck battles. He’s done that lately and that has made him an ideal fit with Peterka and Cozens, who both have the competitiveness to go along with high-end skill. “The three of them together have developed a chemistry on the ice, on the bench they communicate really well,” Granato said. “Cozens is a leader, we know that. Now he has two guys that unequivocally he can lead. He’s doing a great job.” In the short term, Granato is excited to have more balance in the lineup. He also had high praise for the line of Tyson Jost, Kyle Okposo and Zemgus Girgensons, which gave the Sabres more production from a scoring chances standpoint than they have gotten out of a fourth line all season. At five-on-five, the Sabres had 12 scoring chances while that group was on the ice and allowed only six scoring chances. Granato said those three played simple, hard and direct, a message he has been preaching to the entire team. He sees the Cozens line playing that same way but with the high-end skill to go with it. “It’s exciting. Anybody can look up the analytics. Too many of our chances were coming from one line, the Thompson line. Then all of a sudden you start to see (the Cozens line) generate more chances. That’s exciting,” said Granato. “Now you have the second line. The other night was an incredible change for us if you look at the analytics with Jost, Okposo coming back in the lineup and Girgensons. They had more chances than any third or fourth line has had all season in a single game. You could see that visually and see that watching and the numbers back that up. “You start to see the effect of everybody affecting other lines in a positive way. I like it a lot.”
  17. SO cherry picking a riot that happened because of police brutality - which Trump advocated forr, BTW, when he told police not take it easy on people they arrest disputes the fact that Right Wingers can be violent??? OK, dude, really, try being at least a little factual
  18. I love that look. I call it the Anorexic-Look.
  19. Are you fucking blind?? This accurately and obviously shows they did NOT "explode" under Trump. You can actually see they dipped in 2016 when he took office
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