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The Eight Worst ‘Fake News’ Stories of the Trump Years

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The Eight Worst ‘Fake News’ Stories of the Trump Years

 

1. The Imaginary Pee Tape: Ten days before Trump’s inauguration, CNN tried to rain on his big moment by unveiling “exclusive” information that top intelligence officials, including then-FBI Director James Comey, had briefed the President-elect about a 35-page dossier crammed with supposedly damaging information. As is often the case in Washington, the least-likely/most-gossipy parts circulated the most widely, including the highly-implausible claim that Trump, on a visit to Russia, had hired prostitutes to urinate on a bed President Obama had used during an earlier visit.

Of course, no news organization could confirm any of this, but it became a salacious bit of anti-Trump dirt that kept finding its way onto the airwaves. The high water mark for this below-the-belt charge came in April 2018 when Comey, a year after he was fired from the FBI, used a book tour to publicize this smear all over again. He found a willing audience in the Trump-hating press; an MRC study found CNN talked about the non-existent “pee tapes” 77 times in a mere five-day period.

It was nothing but vicious nonsense. A later report from the Justice Department’s Inspector General debunked the myth of a Russian “pee tape,” and found that “the FBI knew early in 2017 that it was a highly dubious story and kept Donald Trump in the dark.”


2. Fake News About a Flynn Deal with Mueller: During live “Special Report” coverage on December 1, 2017: ABC News chief investigative Brian Ross made the jaw-dropping claim that former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn would testify that during the 2016 campaign, then-candidate Donald Trump had “ordered him — directed him to make contact with the Russians, which contradicts all that Donald Trump has said to this point.”

If true, that would conceivably put the President in legal jeopardy; within minutes, Ross’s report was being parroted across the media and the stock market fell more than 300 points. But it turned out that Ross had committed one of the biggest blunders of his career: as Ross clarified hours later, Trump made the alleged request of Flynn not as a candidate, but during the transition — which made it merely an act of foreign policy, not collusion.

ABC suspended Ross for one month without pay and barred him from covering President Trump in the future. He has since left the network.


3. CNN’s Botched WikiLeaks E-Mail ‘Exclusive’: A few days later, on December 8, 2017, CNN.com published an early-morning story by correspondents Manu Raju and Jeremy Herb claiming Trump’s campaign team received an e-mail from WikiLeaks on September 4, 2016 with “a decryption key and website address for hacked WikiLeaks documents” that would not be publicly revealed until September 13.

Was this finally some proof of the collusion that anti-Trump media have been searching for? That morning and into the afternoon, all of CNN’s programs proudly touted a “Breaking News” banner with a “CNN Exclusive” that read the following: “Emails Reveal Effort to Give Trump Campaign WikiLeaks Documents.”

It turned out, the e-mail actually went out on September 14, 2016, after the information was available to anyone.

That afternoon, after hours of breathless hype, CNN issued an on-air correction read by Raju. The reporters however, faced no disciplinary action because, according to a spokewoman, they “followed the editorial standards process.” Some process.


4. Donald Trump, Secret Russian Agent: After the President, at a post-summit press conference, refused to contradict Russian President Vladimir Putin’s denials of election meddling, journalists leaped to offering wild theories that the performance was evidence the Trump was a Russian agent. “We don’t know if Putin is his handler, his hero or his co-conspirator, but it’s obviously where his loyalty lies,” New York Times columnist Michelle Goldberg declared on ABC’s This Week on July 22, 2018.

CNN’s Brian Stelter hosts the weekly Reliable Sources, a show that’s supposed to encourage responsible journalism. Yet he used his program to tout the crazy conspiracies: “Trump’s odd behavior with Vladimir Putin is compelling so many people to ask: ‘What does Putin have on Trump? Has Trump been compromised?’ All of those people, those experts, those reporters, they are looking at the fact pattern and seeing something strange, even sinister.”

The next morning, former Time managing editor Walter Isaacson wandered away from reality on MSNBC’s Morning Joe: “It’s as if Donald Trump has been weaponized over the years by Vladimir Putin to go in and do Putin’s bidding....It is astonishing how he has become such an effective and destructive virus created by Vladimir Putin.”

A few days earlier, CNN’s Don Lemon, used his network’s airwaves to float the notion Trump was guilty of treason: “Article III in Section Three of the Constitution says this, ‘treason against the United States shall consist only in levying war against them or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort.’” Lemon asked historian Douglas Brinkley to agree: “Do you believe the President’s actions fall anywhere within that definition?”

Such venomous speculation only harms the media’s claims that they are a fact-based institution.


5. Liberal TV Nets Trumpet Phony CNN “Exclusive”: On July 26, 2018, CNN’s Jim Sciutto and Carl Bernstein appeared on Cuomo PrimeTime to drop the “exclusive” bombshell claim that Michael Cohen would tell federal investigators that President Trump knew of the infamous Trump Tower meeting before it took place. It was exactly the sort of smoking gun that Trump-haters in the media had been yearning for since the Russia investigation began, and it quickly filled up liberal airwaves.

Cable news went nearly wall-to-wall, while the broadcast networks churned out a combined 28 and a half minutes touting the story on just their July 27 morning and evening news programs. Savannah Guthrie breathlessly opened NBC’s Today: “Breaking overnight, bombshell. President Trump’s longtime lawyer ready to deliver the goods....” ABC’s Good Morning America heralded them as “stunning new claims,” as Justice correspondent Pierre Thomas intoned that “these explosive new allegations are further evidence of the growing rift between President Trump and his former attorney....”

The only problem was, it was all fiction leaked anonymously to CNN and other networks by Cohen’s lawyer (and longtime Clinton lawyer and loyalist) Lanny Davis. The facts came out in late August after Axios reported that Cohen actually did not know if Trump had any knowledge of the meeting. Days later, Buzzfeed exposed that Davis was CNN’s secret source — even after Davis had gone on CNN to assert he was not the source. The broadcast networks that had loudly promoted the fake “bombshell” in July published minor “updates” on their web sites, but didn’t say a word on their airwaves.
 

6. O’Donnell’s Reckless Deutsche Bank Scoop: MSNBC host Lawrence O’Donnell began the August 27, 2019 edition of his 10pm ET Last Word program by teasing 9pm host Rachel Maddow as her show was concluding. “I may have some information,” he promised, pertaining to Donald Trump’s business dealings with Germany’s Deutsche Bank.

While O’Donnell acknowledged that his “information” came from only a single source, and that neither he nor anyone at NBC News had confirmed it, he inexplicably chose to air his inflammatory allegation on live television: “This single source close to Deutsche Bank has told me that Donald Trump’s loan documents there show that he has co-signers. That’s how he was able to obtain those loans. And that the co-signers are Russian oligarchs....That would explain, it seems to me, every kind word Donald Trump has ever said about Russia and Vladimir Putin, if true, and I stress the ‘if true’ part of this.”

The next morning, an MSNBC producer acknowledged that not only had no one at NBC even seen the documents, O’Donnell’s single source hadn’t seen them, either. That’s some “source.”

Once again, a journalist’s eagerness for a smoking gun to implicate the President led them to abandon any pretense of professionalism. With no confirmation from anyone else in the media, O’Donnell sheepishly abandoned his claims the next day, announcing on Twitter: “Last night I made an error in judgment by reporting an item about the president’s finances that didn’t go through our rigorous verification and standards process. I shouldn’t have reported it and I was wrong to discuss it on the air.”

 

7. Blaming Trump for Racist Mass Killings: Grotesquely seeking to exploit horrific tragedies for political advantage, some in the media actually accused the President of inspiring or otherwise supporting brutal mass killings in 2019. “The President needs to at some point look in the mirror and understand that the rhetoric.... give permission to the most craziest people in America,” ABC’s Matthew Dowd charged after a synagogue shooting that left eleven dead in April of that year.

After a horrible shooting in El Paso, Texas in which the gunman singled out Latinos, killing 23, TV viewers once again heard journalists aim the blame at President Trump. “If you’re a white supremacist, you find the President’s words possibly inspirational, possibly comforting,” CNN’s Nia Malika Henderson claimed on August 5. A few hours later, MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace falsely stated: “You now have a President, as you said, talking about exterminating Latinos.”

Those seeking to blame Trump personally for the evil acts of others found support in a March 2019 Washington Post analysis that claimed, according to the headline, that “counties that hosted a 2016 Trump rally saw a 226 percent increase in hate crimes.” The problem: a pair of Harvard researchers trying to duplicate the study found political rallies had no effect on hate crimes. In fact, using the same methodology would actually show “Clinton rallies contribute to an even greater increase in hate incidents than Trump rallies.” Oops.


8. The Coronavirus “Hoax” Hoax: As the coronavirus spread in the U.S., so too did the fake news that President Trump had called the disease a “hoax,” when in reality he used those words to talk about Democrats’ attempt to exploit the crisis. The butchering of reality began just a couple of hours after the President spoke at a February 28 political rally, with Politico’s bogus headline: “Trump rallies his base to treat coronavirus as a ‘hoax.’” That earned Politico a “false” rating from CheckYourFact.com the next day. The left-leaning fact-checker Snopes.com soon agreed, writing on March 2: “Despite creating some confusion with his remarks, Trump did not call the coronavirus itself a hoax.”

But those pesky facts wouldn’t stop some in the liberal media from pushing the phony version they preferred. On March 11, MSNBC’s Joy Reid misled viewers when she claimed “the Trump administration has struggled to present a coherent and unified message about the coronavirus outbreak, careening from downplaying it, with Trump tossing it off as a political hoax, to just seemingly scrambling.”

Three days later, CNN’s Boris Sanchez wrongly claimed the President has “suggested that this coronavirus epidemic — pandemic is a hoax perpetrated by Democrats.”

As late as April 7, NBC’s Tom Costello even bungled the liberal media’s fantasy version of what Trump supposedly said. Talking about a memo written by White House advisor Peter Navarro, Costello asserted: “He wrote that, again, on January 29, at the time that the President was suggesting this was all a hoax.” Actually, that would have been a month before the President said the words that have been so dishonestly distorted.

 

 

 

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Sack "The Buffalo Range's TRUSTED News Source!"

 

"But, man, you're never going to get any truth from us. We'll tell you anything you want to hear; we lie like hell... We'll tell you any shit you want to hear. We deal in *illusions*, man! None of it is true! But you people sit there, day after day, night after night, all ages, colors, creeds... We're all you know. You're beginning to believe the illusions we're spinning here."

 

- Howard Beale, Network

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Cool, can I post the 16,000+ lies and mis-informative things that Trump's told now?

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“There he goes. One of God's own prototypes.

A high-powered mutant of some kind, never even considered for mass production.

Too weird to live, and too rare to die.”

 

Twitter: @HKTheResistance

 

HipKat, on *** other h***, is genuine, unapoli***tically nasty, and w**** his hea** on his ******. jc856

I’ll just forward them to Bridgett. comssvet11

Seek help. soflabillsfan

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Look, a Trump supporter!

Horse-Blinders.jpg


“There he goes. One of God's own prototypes.

A high-powered mutant of some kind, never even considered for mass production.

Too weird to live, and too rare to die.”

 

Twitter: @HKTheResistance

 

HipKat, on *** other h***, is genuine, unapoli***tically nasty, and w**** his hea** on his ******. jc856

I’ll just forward them to Bridgett. comssvet11

Seek help. soflabillsfan

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2 hours ago, 212frawk said:

4wbb7rwew887jhizg.jpg

Do better.  This board affords you (Low-grade Mentality Alpha) the opportunity to have discourse with great journalists (like the original poster) and high-minded idealists (that would be me).  And you take advantage of this, how?  By posting someone else's cartoon?   

I destroy you every time I post.  Every.  Time.  Try and close the gap.  Please, this boredom is excruciating.

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2 minutes ago, HipKat said:

Look, a Trump supporter!

Horse-Blinders.jpg

But when that (Trump) horse is led to the water they make a rational choice base upon:

1)  How thirsty they are.

2)  How far they have to travel that day.

3)  The safety of the water in the trough.

4)  The value/quality of the water in comparison to other readily available water sources.

5)  The hidden costs/consequences that may arise from partaking of that water.

 

Number 5 above is a principle that the TDS-afflicted cannot comprehend.  

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Fixed it for you.

Horse-Blinders CNN.jpg


Sack "The Buffalo Range's TRUSTED News Source!"

 

"But, man, you're never going to get any truth from us. We'll tell you anything you want to hear; we lie like hell... We'll tell you any shit you want to hear. We deal in *illusions*, man! None of it is true! But you people sit there, day after day, night after night, all ages, colors, creeds... We're all you know. You're beginning to believe the illusions we're spinning here."

 

- Howard Beale, Network

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maga.jpg

  • Like 1

process.jpg

 

Fuck this team

I'll tie a frying pan to my ass so you hurt your penis, you ****ing homo!

Shut the fuck up dark cloud pussy

Anyone who is foolish enough to not be a Buffalo Bills fan can go f*ck themselves with a wooden shovel handle.

image-trump-emoticon.png

also, all that shit in your signature is beyond annoying. just like you.

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1 hour ago, FanBack said:

Do better.  This board affords you (Low-grade Mentality Alpha) the opportunity to have discourse with great journalists (like the original poster) and high-minded idealists (that would be me).  And you take advantage of this, how?  By posting someone else's cartoon?   

I destroy you every time I post.  Every.  Time.  Try and close the gap.  Please, this boredom is excruciating.

It was funny 3 years ago. I’m surprised there’s nothing new.


 

 

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5 hours ago, 212frawk said:

a6kloqc7qh9i84ozg.jpg

It's hilarious that Larry David had an episode of Curb where he wears a MAGA hat so he doesn't have to talk to people because everyone is disgusted with MAGA people.


L*t is a loser

 

My adapt a Bill is Brandon Beane.

 

1065198188.jpg.0.jpg

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Remember the time Trump suggested injecting disinfectant?

 

 

 

 

 

 


L*t is a loser

 

My adapt a Bill is Brandon Beane.

 

1065198188.jpg.0.jpg

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Remember when Trump wanted to nuke a Hurricane?

398rte.jpg

38vvi5.jpg

391hg6.jpg


L*t is a loser

 

My adapt a Bill is Brandon Beane.

 

1065198188.jpg.0.jpg

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1 hour ago, Angry Byrds said:

It was funny 3 years ago. I’m surprised there’s nothing new.

I'm constantly coming up with new posts and new ideas.  Really, I'm raising the consciousness (and spirituality of this board).  See this thread (my Trump-Horse post in particular).

I play deep tracks for all of my fans.  But once in awhile, I have to play the hits.

That doesn't make me any less of this Bulletin Board's Shaman.

    

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Remember when Trump said Wind Turbines cause cancer?

sub-buzz-14343-1554320911-1.jpg

sub-buzz-10581-1554320976-1.jpg

574.jpg

trump-wind-cancer.jpg

don-trumpote.jpg


L*t is a loser

 

My adapt a Bill is Brandon Beane.

 

1065198188.jpg.0.jpg

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Remember when Trump lied his way onto the Forbes richest 400 list?

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How Donald Trump lied his way onto the Forbes 400 richest people list

'He totally snowed me,' says journalist Jonathan Greenberg, who helped compile the list

CBC Radio · Posted: May 10, 2019 6:05 PM ET | Last Updated: May 12, 2019
 
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The New York Times published details of Trump's tax losses from 1985 to 1994. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)
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comments
 
Listen9:11

Written by Brent Bambury

Jonathan Greenberg knew Donald Trump was lying to him when he placed him on the Forbes list of America's richest people, but he didn't know the magnitude of Trump's lies until this week.

As a journalist for Forbes, it was Greenberg's job to talk to Trump and try to uncover the truth about his wealth.

 

"I'll never forget coming back from Fifth Avenue in his office in 1982 thinking, 'I cannot believe someone would lie so much and so transparently'," author and journalist Greenberg told Day 6.

The New York Times, on Wednesday, published details of Trump's tax losses, and it clarified some of the obscurity around Trump's wealth by revealing a crushing burden of debt.

The Times report shows Trump suffered massive losses, a total of $1.17 billion US from 1985 to 1994.

Through five of those years, Forbes continued to list Trump among America's wealthiest, and Greenberg put him on the list in 1982, as well. But he says it was a mistake.

"He was worth under $5 million that year when I put him in at $100 million. He should never have been on that list and neither should his father," Greenberg said.

"I mean, he totally snowed me."

 

Scaled back but still a lie

It wasn't a total snow job because Greenberg knew Trump was wildly exaggerating his wealth when he claimed to be a billionaire.

"He was like, 'Are you kidding me? We're worth more than anyone on this list. We're worth a billion dollars. What are you talking about?'"

According to Greenberg, Trump took elaborate and transparent measures to make the case he was richer than he was.

"He pretended to take a phone call from his father advising his father how to place tens of millions of dollars in bond holdings," Greenberg said. "And when I got close I could hear that there was no one on the other end."

 
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Pedestrians walk past Trump Tower on 5th Avenue in New York City. (Caitlin Ochs/Reuters)

When the list came out and valued Trump at a fraction of the wealth he claimed, Trump struck back.

"Then it was Trump management writing letters to Malcolm Forbes," Greenberg remembered. "Calling my editor saying 'How dare he say that we're only worth $200 million or $100 million? I'm worth so much more.'"

 

Greenberg recalls being satisfied that Trump failed to convince him to inflate his worth, but admits that's exactly what happened.

"I went through my life thinking, 'We did a good job. We kept Donald Trump in check. He said he was worth a billion. We got him down to a couple of hundred million.' And in fact, the couple of hundred million was a fiction," he said.

"I was the one who had been snowed."

A call from John Barron

After two years of meeting with Greenberg in his Trump Tower office, Trump tried a new tactic to pump up his valuation on Forbes' 1984 list.

"That year his secretary had set up a call with the VP of finance. '[The secretary said] Mr. Trump can't talk to you this year, but John Barron will and he'll tell you whatever you need to know,'" Greenberg said.

Greenberg recorded the calls and preserved the tapes and there are two key takeaways: nearly everything Barron told Greenberg about Trump's wealth was false, and John Barron didn't really exist.

 

"John Barron was Donald Trump pretending to be his vice-president of finance," Greenberg said.

We were hearing from Trump about this positive cash flow — that he knew we wanted to hear, because we were evaluating wealth on the basis of a multiple of cash flow.- Jonathan Greenberg

"For 45 minutes in May, and then for 40 minutes again in July, I had a conversation with a fictional character who was really Donald Trump. He was feeding me lies that were very carefully fabricated ... He said that all of my father's assets have been consolidated and transferred to me."

In fact none of Fred Trump's properties had been transferred to his son.

"He did own some of his own properties," Greenberg said. "But as we see in the Times report, they were very heavily leveraged."

How Forbes calculated Trump's worth

Greenberg says Forbes made its estimates of Trump's wealth based on the real estate Trump held at the time.

"We knew what the buildings were. We knew when they had it built. We had a sense from others how heavily leveraged they were," Greenberg said. 

 

But there was little indication of the massive debt Greenberg read about in the Times this week.

"I was fascinated by ... how large the losses were and how far back they went, because we were hearing from Trump about this positive cash flow — that he knew we wanted to hear, because we were evaluating wealth on the basis of a multiple of cash flow," he said.

 
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U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally. (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

Greenberg admits he overestimated Trump's wealth and underestimated his mendacity. But he's not buying Trump's explanation that losses of $1.17 billion were advantageous to borrowing money.

"Real estate people need to leverage. They need to borrow money and they need to convince lenders that they are able to pay the debt service on those loans," Greenberg said.

"And if you show $50 million in losses, what it says is that all of your available cash flow from your rentals are not sufficient to pay the debt service. They're not going to loan you a dime."

Donald Trump was removed from the Forbes 400 in 1990, but re-entered in 1996.

He's remained on the list ever since.

 

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/day6/gig-economy-workers-unite-trump-s-billion-dollar-con-hatari-vs-eurovision-ramadan-in-xinjiang-and-more-1.5126682/how-donald-trump-lied-his-way-onto-the-forbes-400-richest-people-list-1.5126688

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TRUMP’S FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ARE SO FULL OF LIES THAT HIS ACCOUNTANTS PUT A WARNING LABEL ON THEM

Newly obtained documents show the brazen methods with which the president inflated his assets to banks and insurance companies.
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MARCH 28, 2019
 

Donald Trump speaks at the Major County Sheriffs and Major Cities Chiefs Association Joint Conference on February 13 2019. BY MICHAEL REYNOLDS/POOL/GETTY IMAGES.

 
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During his 72 years on Earth, Donald Trump has told something like 2,936,880 lies, based on my back-of-the-envelope calculations. (According to The Washington Post, the president has told at least 9,179 whoppers just since taking the oath of office—so, you do the math.) Sometimes, the lies are big, like the one he told about seeing “thousands” of supposed terrorist sympathizers “cheering” from New Jersey as the World Trade Center towers collapsed on 9/11. Other times, the lies are small and largely pointless, like his claim that he didn’t call Tim Cook “Tim Apple” when he 100 percent did, on-camera, in a room full of people. Frequently, the lies revolve around his net worth, including its origin (his father) and how big it is (a lot smaller than he claims). As we learned from Michael Cohen’s congressional testimony last month and a New York Times exposé last week, Trump’s lies about his wealth haven’t been confined to bragging about it on TV, but have also allegedly manifested in financial statements sent to banks and insurance companies, in which the ex-real-estate developer inflated his assets in order to obtain loans. And now, thanks to documents obtained by the Post, we have some fun examples of his most absurd financial claims, many of which are now under scrutiny.

In a 2011 document known as a “Statement of Financial Condition,” Trump purported to own 55 home lots ready to sell for at least $3 million apiece at his Southern California golf course. Yet, in reality, he’d only been zoned for 31, thereby overstating his future revenue by a cool $72-odd million. In a document from 2012, he tacked on an extra 800 acres to the size of his roughly 1,200 acre Virginia vineyard. In 2013, in an attempt to bolster his bid for the Buffalo Bills, a two-page “Summary of Net Worth” conveniently omitted his ownership of two hotels, in Chicago and Las Vegas, meaning, per the Post, “that some of Trump’s actual debt load was hidden from anyone reading the statement.” In perhaps the most brazen, Trumpian “exaggeration,” he invented an extra 10 stories at Trump Tower, claiming that the building was 68 stories when, in actuality—you can literally look at the building and count them—there are 58.

In a sign of just how ridiculous these statements were, the accountants who prepared the documents literally put a disclaimer on them, effectively stating that Trump was full of shit:

 

When compiling these statements of financial condition, those accountants have said they did not verify or audit the figures in the statements. Instead, when Trump provided them data, they wrote it down without checking to see whether it was accurate . . . The documents begin with two-page disclaimers, warning of various ways in which the statements don’t follow normal accounting rules. The accountants note that Trump is the source of many buildings’ valuations—and that, contrary to normal accounting rules, he had inflated them by counting future income that wasn’t guaranteed.

 
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“Users of this financial statement should recognize that they might reach different conclusions about the financial condition of Donald J. Trump” if they had more information, the statement concludes.

The accounting firm said Wednesday—the same day the House Oversight Committee requested 10 years of Trump’s financial statements—that it “believes strongly in the ethical and professional rules and regulations that govern our industry, our work, and our client interactions.” Earlier this month, the New York State Department of Financial Services subpoenaed records from Aon, Trump’s longtime insurer.

 

While the Post notes that Trump is “far from the first real-estate developer to inflate his projects or wealth,” it also notes that there are these things called “laws,” some of which Trump may have broken by “defrauding insurers and lenders with false information.” (The White House declined to comment.) Experts say the question of whether or not Trump will face legal consequences likely hinges on whether he “intended to mislead,” or if “the misstatements caused anyone to give him a financial benefit.” If the errors were “systematic and it’s across the board, and it’s all in one direction, that’s where you have a problem,” Kyle Welch, an assistant professor of accountancy at George Washington University, told reporters David A. Fahrenthold and Jonathan O’Connell. And, incredibly, the fact that the “errors” were so brazen may work out in Trump’s favor:

. . . in an odd way, Welch said, Trump could be helped by the sheer scale of the exaggerations. They were so far off from reality, Welch wondered whether any real bank or insurer could have been fooled. Welch said he’d never seen a document stretch so far past the normal conventions of accounting. “It’s humorous,” Welch said. “It’s a humorous financial statement.”

If you would like to receive the Levin Report in your inbox daily, click here to subscribe.

 

Elizabeth Warren sends another Wells Fargo C.E.O. home in a body bag

On September 20, 2016, Senator Elizabeth Warren publicly disemboweled then-Wells Fargo C.E.O. John Stumpf, telling him during a congressional hearing “you should resign,” owing to his stewardship, or lack thereof, during the firm’s sham-accounts scandal. And less than a month later, he did! While it took it a little longer between Warren tearing Tim Sloan, Stumpf’s successor, a new one, and the announcement that he would be leaving the company, we still think she can add this one to her tally:

 
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After two years at the helm, Wells Fargo C.E.O. Tim Sloan will step down effective immediately. The company’s general counsel Allen Parker will serve as interim C.E.O. while the company searches for a new chief executive.

Here’s a story about Ivanka Trump

It’s from Vicky Ward’s new book, Kushner, Inc., and it sounds about right!

The couple first lived in Jared’s duplex on Astor Place, then moved to a Trump building on Park Avenue and Fifty-ninth Street. They liked to entertain, and still do. . . . Mostly, in the early days of their marriage, their social group consisted of fellow silver-spooners (Rob Speyer, Jamie Johnson, David Lauren), or the older moguls they aspired to be like. It was a very insular and often smug world. At one Astor Place dinner party, Richard Mack found himself sitting next to Blake Lively. Mack is serious-minded; he had absolutely no idea who the Gossip Girl actress was. But he did remember that at one point in the conversation, Ivanka was adamant that “libertarian” and “liberal” were the same thing, and would not be dissuaded. When Mack suggested they look it up, she said, “I’ll take it under advisement.”

Shortly before Kushner, Inc. was released, the Kushner/Trump camp insisted, through a spokesman, that “Every point that Ms. Ward mentioned in what she called her ‘fact-checking’ stage was entirely false,” and that “It seems she has written a book of fiction rather than any serious attempt to get the facts. Correcting everything wrong would take too long and be pointless.”

 

https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2019/03/trump-financial-statements-full-of-lies


L*t is a loser

 

My adapt a Bill is Brandon Beane.

 

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Remember when Trump used illegal Polish labor to build the Trump Towers?

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Donald Trump Paid $1.4 Million in a Dispute Over Undocumented Workers. Read the Newly Unsealed Legal Papers

 
Here's What President Trump Has Said About DACA in the Past
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NOVEMBER 28, 2017 2:19 PM EST

Donald Trump quietly paid $1.4 million in 1998 to settle a class-action lawsuit that alleged he stiffed a union pension fund by employing undocumented Polish laborers to demolish a department store to make way for Trump Tower.

The amount became public this week after a judge released previously sealed settlement documents in response to a motion filed by Time Inc. and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press in 2016.

“This Order shall remain confidential in accordance with the parties’ agreement at the October 26, 1998 settlement conference,” reads the settlement agreement, which was signed on Dec. 30, 1998, by District Court Judge Thomas P. Griesa of New York’s Southern District.

The case originated in the summer of 1980, when Trump was under pressure to finish the demolition of the Bonwit Teller building on Fifth Avenue in New York City so that he could begin construction on his signature project, the Trump Tower.

As noted in an Aug. 25, 2016, story in TIME, Trump hired a group of undocumented Polish laborers who put in “12-hour shifts with inadequate safety equipment at subpar wages that their contractor paid sporadically, if at all.”

Their hiring led to years-long litigation that Trump finally settled in 1998.

Read the plaintiffs’ memoranda in support of a settlement, the notice of a motion on the case, a transcript of a conference on the settlement and the settlement below.

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Demolition Memorandum in Support by TIME on Scribd

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Demolition Plaintiffs Affidavit by TIME on Scribd

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Demolition Notice of Motion by TIME on Scribd

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Demolition Plaintiffs Memorandum by TIME on Scribd

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Demolition Court Order by TIME on Scribd

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Demolition Legal Settlement by TIME on Scribd

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Demolition Transcript by TIME on Scribd

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Amended Order by TIME on Scribd

CONTACT US AT EDITORS@TIME.COM.

 

https://time.com/5039109/donald-trump-undocumented-polish-trump-tower-bonwit-teller/

Quote

 

Donald Trump paid $1.375 million to settle case involving undocumented Polish workers, reveal documents

 

The men were paid to demolish the site where Trump Tower now stands

 
 
 
Investigators want to know what attendees of a Trump Tower meeting with campaign officials discussed in a subsequent meeting
 
Investigators want to know what attendees of a Trump Tower meeting with campaign officials discussed in a subsequent meeting ( Utrecht Robin/action press/REX )

In 1980, under pressure to begin construction on what would become his signature project, Donald Trump employed a crew of 200 undocumented Polish workers who worked in 12-hour shifts, without gloves, hard hats or masks, to demolish the Bonwit Teller building on New York's Fifth Avenue, where the 58-story, golden-hued Trump Tower now stands.

The workers were paid as little as $4 (£3) an hour for their dangerous labour, less than half the union wage, if they got paid at all.

 

Their treatment led to years of litigation over Mr Trump’s labour practices, and in 1998, despite frequent claims that he never settles lawsuits, he quietly reached an agreement to end a class-action suit over the Bonwit Teller demolition in which he was a defendant.

 
 
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For almost 20 years, the terms of that settlement have remained a secret. But last week, the settlement documents were unsealed by Loretta A Preska, a US District Court judge for the Southern District of New York, in response to a 2016 motion filed by Time Inc. and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press. Preska found that the public’s right to know of court proceedings in a class-action case was strengthened by the involvement of the “now-president of the United States.”

 

In a 21-page finding, Preska wrote that “the Trump Parties have failed to identify any interests that can overcome the common law and First Amendment presumptions of access to the four documents at issue.”

 

On the campaign trail and as president, Trump has made curbing immigration one of his top priorities, seeking to close the borders to people from certain Muslim-majority countries and to deport immigrants who are here illegally. The settlement serves as a reminder that as an employer he relied on illegal immigrants to get a dangerous and dirty job done.

 

Katie Townsend, litigation director of the Reporters Committee, called the decision a major victory that goes beyond this one case. “It makes clear that both the First Amendment and common law rights of public access apply to settlement-related documents in class actions,” she said.

Lawyers for Trump were not immediately available for comment.

 
Donald Trump calls Elizabeth Warren 'Pocahontas' in front of Native American veterans

The documents show that Trump paid $1.375 million to settle the case, known as Hardy vs Kaszycki, with $500,000 of it going to a union benefits fund and the rest to pay lawyers’ fees and expenses. According to the documents, one of the union lawyers involved asked the judge to ensure “prompt payment” from Trump, suggesting “within two weeks after the settlement date.”

 

Trump jumped in to object. “Thirty days is normal,” he said.

For the demolition work, Trump hired an inexperienced contractor, William Kaszycki of Kaszycki & Sons, for $775,000 (£585,000). Kaszycki specialized in window and job-site cleaning. His company was renovating an adjoining building for Bonwit Teller, where he employed undocumented Polish workers.

Trump would later testify that he never walked into the adjoining building or noticed the Polish workers. But a foreman on the job, Zbignew Goryn, testified that Trump visited the site, marvelling to him about the Polish crew.

 
 
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“He liked the way the men were working on 57th Street,” Goryn said. “He said, ‘Those Polish guys are good, hard workers.'”

The demolition began in January 1980. It was hard, dirty work, breaking up concrete floors, ripping out electrical wiring and cutting pipes while labouring in a cloud of dust and asbestos.

A smaller group of union demolition workers, who were paid much higher wages and, unlike the Poles, overtime, often made fun of their Polish co-workers, according to the testimony of Adam Mrowiec, one of the Polish labourers. “They told me and my friends that we are stupid Poles and we are working for such low money,” he said.

 

In 1998, Wojciech Kozak described to The New York Times the backbreaking labour on the job.

“We worked in horrid, terrible conditions,” Kozak said. “We were frightened illegal immigrants and did not know enough about our rights.”

Today, Kozak, now 75, lives at the O’Donnell-Dempsey Senior Housing building in Elizabeth, New Jersey.

Activists protest Donald Trump's proposed Muslim ban

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He has blue eyes and a strong handshake, but speaks through a special device because he had a tracheotomy for cancer. He proudly showed off his citizenship papers, dated Nov. 3, 1995.

 

Kozak still recalls the work, and seeing Trump at the site in 1980.

“We were working, 12 to 16 hours a day and were paid $4 an hour,” he said. “Because I worked with an acetylene torch, I got $5 an hour. We worked without masks. Nobody knew what asbestos was. I was an immigrant. I worked very hard.”

But Kaszycki stopped paying the men, and they eventually took their complaints to a lawyer named John Szabo. Szabo went to Thomas Macari, a vice president of the Trump Organization, threatening to place a mechanic’s lien on the property if the men weren’t paid.

Still, there were problems. Szabo filed the lien, prompting Trump to ask for help from Daniel Sullivan, a labour consultant. Sullivan later testified that Trump described his “difficulties,” and “that he had some illegal Polish employees.”

 

Trump, however, testified that he did he not remember that there were undocumented Polish workers on the job, or signing paychecks for the crew. “I really still don’t know that there were illegal aliens,” Trump said on the stand.

Read more

Trump did, according to Szabo, have his lawyer call Szabo with a threat to call Immigration and Naturalization Service to have the men deported.

Szabo got the Labor Department to open a wages-and-hours case for the men, which ultimately won a judgement of $254,000 against Kaszycki.

 

Kaszycki had signed a contract with Local 79 of the House Wreckers Union. But while Kaszycki or Trump paid into the union welfare funds for the handful of union workers on the job, they had not done so for the bulk of the workforce, the undocumented, nonunion Poles.

A union dissident and former boxer, Harry Diduck, brought a case in federal court in 1983 against Kaszycki and, eventually, Trump and others, claiming that Kaszycki, the union president and Trump had colluded to deprive the welfare funds of about $600,000.

A judge ruled that Trump was a legal employer of the Poles, but both sides appealed elements of his decision, with the possibility that the total welfare funds could get reduced to $500,000 (£380,000). On the eve of a second trial, Trump settled.

New York Times

 

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/donald-trump-undocumented-polish-workers-tower-paid-settlement-millions-bonwit-teller-building-new-a8080336.html


L*t is a loser

 

My adapt a Bill is Brandon Beane.

 

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5 hours ago, HipKat said:

Cool, can I post the 16,000+ lies and mis-informative things that Trump's told now?

Trump lies every time he opens his mouth. 

  • Like 1

L*t is a loser

 

My adapt a Bill is Brandon Beane.

 

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How Donald Trump lied his way onto the Forbes 400 richest people list

'He totally snowed me,' says journalist Jonathan Greenberg, who helped compile the list

CBC Radio · Posted: May 10, 2019 6:05 PM ET | Last Updated: May 12, 2019
 
1148029623.jpg
The New York Times published details of Trump's tax losses from 1985 to 1994. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)
989
comments
 
Listen9:11

Written by Brent Bambury

Jonathan Greenberg knew Donald Trump was lying to him when he placed him on the Forbes list of America's richest people, but he didn't know the magnitude of Trump's lies until this week.

As a journalist for Forbes, it was Greenberg's job to talk to Trump and try to uncover the truth about his wealth.

 

"I'll never forget coming back from Fifth Avenue in his office in 1982 thinking, 'I cannot believe someone would lie so much and so transparently'," author and journalist Greenberg told Day 6.

The New York Times, on Wednesday, published details of Trump's tax losses, and it clarified some of the obscurity around Trump's wealth by revealing a crushing burden of debt.

The Times report shows Trump suffered massive losses, a total of $1.17 billion US from 1985 to 1994.

Through five of those years, Forbes continued to list Trump among America's wealthiest, and Greenberg put him on the list in 1982, as well. But he says it was a mistake.

"He was worth under $5 million that year when I put him in at $100 million. He should never have been on that list and neither should his father," Greenberg said.

"I mean, he totally snowed me."

 

Scaled back but still a lie

It wasn't a total snow job because Greenberg knew Trump was wildly exaggerating his wealth when he claimed to be a billionaire.

"He was like, 'Are you kidding me? We're worth more than anyone on this list. We're worth a billion dollars. What are you talking about?'"

According to Greenberg, Trump took elaborate and transparent measures to make the case he was richer than he was.

"He pretended to take a phone call from his father advising his father how to place tens of millions of dollars in bond holdings," Greenberg said. "And when I got close I could hear that there was no one on the other end."

 
usa-trump-russia.jpg
Pedestrians walk past Trump Tower on 5th Avenue in New York City. (Caitlin Ochs/Reuters)

When the list came out and valued Trump at a fraction of the wealth he claimed, Trump struck back.

"Then it was Trump management writing letters to Malcolm Forbes," Greenberg remembered. "Calling my editor saying 'How dare he say that we're only worth $200 million or $100 million? I'm worth so much more.'"

 

Greenberg recalls being satisfied that Trump failed to convince him to inflate his worth, but admits that's exactly what happened.

"I went through my life thinking, 'We did a good job. We kept Donald Trump in check. He said he was worth a billion. We got him down to a couple of hundred million.' And in fact, the couple of hundred million was a fiction," he said.

"I was the one who had been snowed."

A call from John Barron

After two years of meeting with Greenberg in his Trump Tower office, Trump tried a new tactic to pump up his valuation on Forbes' 1984 list.

"That year his secretary had set up a call with the VP of finance. '[The secretary said] Mr. Trump can't talk to you this year, but John Barron will and he'll tell you whatever you need to know,'" Greenberg said.

Greenberg recorded the calls and preserved the tapes and there are two key takeaways: nearly everything Barron told Greenberg about Trump's wealth was false, and John Barron didn't really exist.

 

"John Barron was Donald Trump pretending to be his vice-president of finance," Greenberg said.

We were hearing from Trump about this positive cash flow — that he knew we wanted to hear, because we were evaluating wealth on the basis of a multiple of cash flow.- Jonathan Greenberg

"For 45 minutes in May, and then for 40 minutes again in July, I had a conversation with a fictional character who was really Donald Trump. He was feeding me lies that were very carefully fabricated ... He said that all of my father's assets have been consolidated and transferred to me."

In fact none of Fred Trump's properties had been transferred to his son.

"He did own some of his own properties," Greenberg said. "But as we see in the Times report, they were very heavily leveraged."

How Forbes calculated Trump's worth

Greenberg says Forbes made its estimates of Trump's wealth based on the real estate Trump held at the time.

"We knew what the buildings were. We knew when they had it built. We had a sense from others how heavily leveraged they were," Greenberg said. 

 

But there was little indication of the massive debt Greenberg read about in the Times this week.

"I was fascinated by ... how large the losses were and how far back they went, because we were hearing from Trump about this positive cash flow — that he knew we wanted to hear, because we were evaluating wealth on the basis of a multiple of cash flow," he said.

 
usa-trump.jpg
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally. (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

Greenberg admits he overestimated Trump's wealth and underestimated his mendacity. But he's not buying Trump's explanation that losses of $1.17 billion were advantageous to borrowing money.

"Real estate people need to leverage. They need to borrow money and they need to convince lenders that they are able to pay the debt service on those loans," Greenberg said.

"And if you show $50 million in losses, what it says is that all of your available cash flow from your rentals are not sufficient to pay the debt service. They're not going to loan you a dime."

Donald Trump was removed from the Forbes 400 in 1990, but re-entered in 1996.

He's remained on the list ever since.

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/day6/gig-economy-workers-unite-trump-s-billion-dollar-con-hatari-vs-eurovision-ramadan-in-xinjiang-and-more-1.5126682/how-donald-trump-lied-his-way-onto-the-forbes-400-richest-people-list-1.5126688

  Quote

TRUMP’S FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ARE SO FULL OF LIES THAT HIS ACCOUNTANTS PUT A WARNING LABEL ON THEM

Newly obtained documents show the brazen methods with which the president inflated his assets to banks and insurance companies.
bess_levin.png
MARCH 28, 2019
 

Donald Trump speaks at the Major County Sheriffs and Major Cities Chiefs Association Joint Conference on February 13 2019. BY MICHAEL REYNOLDS/POOL/GETTY IMAGES.

 
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During his 72 years on Earth, Donald Trump has told something like 2,936,880 lies, based on my back-of-the-envelope calculations. (According to The Washington Post, the president has told at least 9,179 whoppers just since taking the oath of office—so, you do the math.) Sometimes, the lies are big, like the one he told about seeing “thousands” of supposed terrorist sympathizers “cheering” from New Jersey as the World Trade Center towers collapsed on 9/11. Other times, the lies are small and largely pointless, like his claim that he didn’t call Tim Cook “Tim Apple” when he 100 percent did, on-camera, in a room full of people. Frequently, the lies revolve around his net worth, including its origin (his father) and how big it is (a lot smaller than he claims). As we learned from Michael Cohen’s congressional testimony last month and a New York Times exposé last week, Trump’s lies about his wealth haven’t been confined to bragging about it on TV, but have also allegedly manifested in financial statements sent to banks and insurance companies, in which the ex-real-estate developer inflated his assets in order to obtain loans. And now, thanks to documents obtained by the Post, we have some fun examples of his most absurd financial claims, many of which are now under scrutiny.

In a 2011 document known as a “Statement of Financial Condition,” Trump purported to own 55 home lots ready to sell for at least $3 million apiece at his Southern California golf course. Yet, in reality, he’d only been zoned for 31, thereby overstating his future revenue by a cool $72-odd million. In a document from 2012, he tacked on an extra 800 acres to the size of his roughly 1,200 acre Virginia vineyard. In 2013, in an attempt to bolster his bid for the Buffalo Bills, a two-page “Summary of Net Worth” conveniently omitted his ownership of two hotels, in Chicago and Las Vegas, meaning, per the Post, “that some of Trump’s actual debt load was hidden from anyone reading the statement.” In perhaps the most brazen, Trumpian “exaggeration,” he invented an extra 10 stories at Trump Tower, claiming that the building was 68 stories when, in actuality—you can literally look at the building and count them—there are 58.

In a sign of just how ridiculous these statements were, the accountants who prepared the documents literally put a disclaimer on them, effectively stating that Trump was full of shit:

 

When compiling these statements of financial condition, those accountants have said they did not verify or audit the figures in the statements. Instead, when Trump provided them data, they wrote it down without checking to see whether it was accurate . . . The documents begin with two-page disclaimers, warning of various ways in which the statements don’t follow normal accounting rules. The accountants note that Trump is the source of many buildings’ valuations—and that, contrary to normal accounting rules, he had inflated them by counting future income that wasn’t guaranteed.

 
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“Users of this financial statement should recognize that they might reach different conclusions about the financial condition of Donald J. Trump” if they had more information, the statement concludes.

The accounting firm said Wednesday—the same day the House Oversight Committee requested 10 years of Trump’s financial statements—that it “believes strongly in the ethical and professional rules and regulations that govern our industry, our work, and our client interactions.” Earlier this month, the New York State Department of Financial Services subpoenaed records from Aon, Trump’s longtime insurer.

 

While the Post notes that Trump is “far from the first real-estate developer to inflate his projects or wealth,” it also notes that there are these things called “laws,” some of which Trump may have broken by “defrauding insurers and lenders with false information.” (The White House declined to comment.) Experts say the question of whether or not Trump will face legal consequences likely hinges on whether he “intended to mislead,” or if “the misstatements caused anyone to give him a financial benefit.” If the errors were “systematic and it’s across the board, and it’s all in one direction, that’s where you have a problem,” Kyle Welch, an assistant professor of accountancy at George Washington University, told reporters David A. Fahrenthold and Jonathan O’Connell. And, incredibly, the fact that the “errors” were so brazen may work out in Trump’s favor:

. . . in an odd way, Welch said, Trump could be helped by the sheer scale of the exaggerations. They were so far off from reality, Welch wondered whether any real bank or insurer could have been fooled. Welch said he’d never seen a document stretch so far past the normal conventions of accounting. “It’s humorous,” Welch said. “It’s a humorous financial statement.”

If you would like to receive the Levin Report in your inbox daily, click here to subscribe.

 

Elizabeth Warren sends another Wells Fargo C.E.O. home in a body bag

On September 20, 2016, Senator Elizabeth Warren publicly disemboweled then-Wells Fargo C.E.O. John Stumpf, telling him during a congressional hearing “you should resign,” owing to his stewardship, or lack thereof, during the firm’s sham-accounts scandal. And less than a month later, he did! While it took it a little longer between Warren tearing Tim Sloan, Stumpf’s successor, a new one, and the announcement that he would be leaving the company, we still think she can add this one to her tally:

 
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After two years at the helm, Wells Fargo C.E.O. Tim Sloan will step down effective immediately. The company’s general counsel Allen Parker will serve as interim C.E.O. while the company searches for a new chief executive.

Here’s a story about Ivanka Trump

It’s from Vicky Ward’s new book, Kushner, Inc., and it sounds about right!

The couple first lived in Jared’s duplex on Astor Place, then moved to a Trump building on Park Avenue and Fifty-ninth Street. They liked to entertain, and still do. . . . Mostly, in the early days of their marriage, their social group consisted of fellow silver-spooners (Rob Speyer, Jamie Johnson, David Lauren), or the older moguls they aspired to be like. It was a very insular and often smug world. At one Astor Place dinner party, Richard Mack found himself sitting next to Blake Lively. Mack is serious-minded; he had absolutely no idea who the Gossip Girl actress was. But he did remember that at one point in the conversation, Ivanka was adamant that “libertarian” and “liberal” were the same thing, and would not be dissuaded. When Mack suggested they look it up, she said, “I’ll take it under advisement.”

Shortly before Kushner, Inc. was released, the Kushner/Trump camp insisted, through a spokesman, that “Every point that Ms. Ward mentioned in what she called her ‘fact-checking’ stage was entirely false,” and that “It seems she has written a book of fiction rather than any serious attempt to get the facts. Correcting everything wrong would take too long and be pointless.”

 

 

 

 

How Donald Trump lied his way onto the Forbes 400 richest people list

'He totally snowed me,' says journalist Jonathan Greenberg, who helped compile the list

CBC Radio · Posted: May 10, 2019 6:05 PM ET | Last Updated: May 12, 2019
 
1148029623.jpg
The New York Times published details of Trump's tax losses from 1985 to 1994. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)
989
comments
 
Listen9:11

Written by Brent Bambury

Jonathan Greenberg knew Donald Trump was lying to him when he placed him on the Forbes list of America's richest people, but he didn't know the magnitude of Trump's lies until this week.

As a journalist for Forbes, it was Greenberg's job to talk to Trump and try to uncover the truth about his wealth.

 

"I'll never forget coming back from Fifth Avenue in his office in 1982 thinking, 'I cannot believe someone would lie so much and so transparently'," author and journalist Greenberg told Day 6.

The New York Times, on Wednesday, published details of Trump's tax losses, and it clarified some of the obscurity around Trump's wealth by revealing a crushing burden of debt.

The Times report shows Trump suffered massive losses, a total of $1.17 billion US from 1985 to 1994.

Through five of those years, Forbes continued to list Trump among America's wealthiest, and Greenberg put him on the list in 1982, as well. But he says it was a mistake.

"He was worth under $5 million that year when I put him in at $100 million. He should never have been on that list and neither should his father," Greenberg said.

"I mean, he totally snowed me."

 

Scaled back but still a lie

It wasn't a total snow job because Greenberg knew Trump was wildly exaggerating his wealth when he claimed to be a billionaire.

"He was like, 'Are you kidding me? We're worth more than anyone on this list. We're worth a billion dollars. What are you talking about?'"

According to Greenberg, Trump took elaborate and transparent measures to make the case he was richer than he was.

"He pretended to take a phone call from his father advising his father how to place tens of millions of dollars in bond holdings," Greenberg said. "And when I got close I could hear that there was no one on the other end."

 
usa-trump-russia.jpg
Pedestrians walk past Trump Tower on 5th Avenue in New York City. (Caitlin Ochs/Reuters)

When the list came out and valued Trump at a fraction of the wealth he claimed, Trump struck back.

"Then it was Trump management writing letters to Malcolm Forbes," Greenberg remembered. "Calling my editor saying 'How dare he say that we're only worth $200 million or $100 million? I'm worth so much more.'"

 

Greenberg recalls being satisfied that Trump failed to convince him to inflate his worth, but admits that's exactly what happened.

"I went through my life thinking, 'We did a good job. We kept Donald Trump in check. He said he was worth a billion. We got him down to a couple of hundred million.' And in fact, the couple of hundred million was a fiction," he said.

"I was the one who had been snowed."

A call from John Barron

After two years of meeting with Greenberg in his Trump Tower office, Trump tried a new tactic to pump up his valuation on Forbes' 1984 list.

"That year his secretary had set up a call with the VP of finance. '[The secretary said] Mr. Trump can't talk to you this year, but John Barron will and he'll tell you whatever you need to know,'" Greenberg said.

Greenberg recorded the calls and preserved the tapes and there are two key takeaways: nearly everything Barron told Greenberg about Trump's wealth was false, and John Barron didn't really exist.

 

"John Barron was Donald Trump pretending to be his vice-president of finance," Greenberg said.

We were hearing from Trump about this positive cash flow — that he knew we wanted to hear, because we were evaluating wealth on the basis of a multiple of cash flow.- Jonathan Greenberg

"For 45 minutes in May, and then for 40 minutes again in July, I had a conversation with a fictional character who was really Donald Trump. He was feeding me lies that were very carefully fabricated ... He said that all of my father's assets have been consolidated and transferred to me."

In fact none of Fred Trump's properties had been transferred to his son.

"He did own some of his own properties," Greenberg said. "But as we see in the Times report, they were very heavily leveraged."

How Forbes calculated Trump's worth

Greenberg says Forbes made its estimates of Trump's wealth based on the real estate Trump held at the time.

"We knew what the buildings were. We knew when they had it built. We had a sense from others how heavily leveraged they were," Greenberg said. 

 

But there was little indication of the massive debt Greenberg read about in the Times this week.

"I was fascinated by ... how large the losses were and how far back they went, because we were hearing from Trump about this positive cash flow — that he knew we wanted to hear, because we were evaluating wealth on the basis of a multiple of cash flow," he said.

 
usa-trump.jpg
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally. (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

Greenberg admits he overestimated Trump's wealth and underestimated his mendacity. But he's not buying Trump's explanation that losses of $1.17 billion were advantageous to borrowing money.

"Real estate people need to leverage. They need to borrow money and they need to convince lenders that they are able to pay the debt service on those loans," Greenberg said.

"And if you show $50 million in losses, what it says is that all of your available cash flow from your rentals are not sufficient to pay the debt service. They're not going to loan you a dime."

Donald Trump was removed from the Forbes 400 in 1990, but re-entered in 1996.

He's remained on the list ever since.

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/day6/gig-economy-workers-unite-trump-s-billion-dollar-con-hatari-vs-eurovision-ramadan-in-xinjiang-and-more-1.5126682/how-donald-trump-lied-his-way-onto-the-forbes-400-richest-people-list-1.5126688

  Quote

TRUMP’S FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ARE SO FULL OF LIES THAT HIS ACCOUNTANTS PUT A WARNING LABEL ON THEM

Newly obtained documents show the brazen methods with which the president inflated his assets to banks and insurance companies.
bess_levin.png
MARCH 28, 2019
 

Donald Trump speaks at the Major County Sheriffs and Major Cities Chiefs Association Joint Conference on February 13 2019. BY MICHAEL REYNOLDS/POOL/GETTY IMAGES.

 
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During his 72 years on Earth, Donald Trump has told something like 2,936,880 lies, based on my back-of-the-envelope calculations. (According to The Washington Post, the president has told at least 9,179 whoppers just since taking the oath of office—so, you do the math.) Sometimes, the lies are big, like the one he told about seeing “thousands” of supposed terrorist sympathizers “cheering” from New Jersey as the World Trade Center towers collapsed on 9/11. Other times, the lies are small and largely pointless, like his claim that he didn’t call Tim Cook “Tim Apple” when he 100 percent did, on-camera, in a room full of people. Frequently, the lies revolve around his net worth, including its origin (his father) and how big it is (a lot smaller than he claims). As we learned from Michael Cohen’s congressional testimony last month and a New York Times exposé last week, Trump’s lies about his wealth haven’t been confined to bragging about it on TV, but have also allegedly manifested in financial statements sent to banks and insurance companies, in which the ex-real-estate developer inflated his assets in order to obtain loans. And now, thanks to documents obtained by the Post, we have some fun examples of his most absurd financial claims, many of which are now under scrutiny.

In a 2011 document known as a “Statement of Financial Condition,” Trump purported to own 55 home lots ready to sell for at least $3 million apiece at his Southern California golf course. Yet, in reality, he’d only been zoned for 31, thereby overstating his future revenue by a cool $72-odd million. In a document from 2012, he tacked on an extra 800 acres to the size of his roughly 1,200 acre Virginia vineyard. In 2013, in an attempt to bolster his bid for the Buffalo Bills, a two-page “Summary of Net Worth” conveniently omitted his ownership of two hotels, in Chicago and Las Vegas, meaning, per the Post, “that some of Trump’s actual debt load was hidden from anyone reading the statement.” In perhaps the most brazen, Trumpian “exaggeration,” he invented an extra 10 stories at Trump Tower, claiming that the building was 68 stories when, in actuality—you can literally look at the building and count them—there are 58.

In a sign of just how ridiculous these statements were, the accountants who prepared the documents literally put a disclaimer on them, effectively stating that Trump was full of shit:

 

When compiling these statements of financial condition, those accountants have said they did not verify or audit the figures in the statements. Instead, when Trump provided them data, they wrote it down without checking to see whether it was accurate . . . The documents begin with two-page disclaimers, warning of various ways in which the statements don’t follow normal accounting rules. The accountants note that Trump is the source of many buildings’ valuations—and that, contrary to normal accounting rules, he had inflated them by counting future income that wasn’t guaranteed.

 
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“Users of this financial statement should recognize that they might reach different conclusions about the financial condition of Donald J. Trump” if they had more information, the statement concludes.

The accounting firm said Wednesday—the same day the House Oversight Committee requested 10 years of Trump’s financial statements—that it “believes strongly in the ethical and professional rules and regulations that govern our industry, our work, and our client interactions.” Earlier this month, the New York State Department of Financial Services subpoenaed records from Aon, Trump’s longtime insurer.

 

While the Post notes that Trump is “far from the first real-estate developer to inflate his projects or wealth,” it also notes that there are these things called “laws,” some of which Trump may have broken by “defrauding insurers and lenders with false information.” (The White House declined to comment.) Experts say the question of whether or not Trump will face legal consequences likely hinges on whether he “intended to mislead,” or if “the misstatements caused anyone to give him a financial benefit.” If the errors were “systematic and it’s across the board, and it’s all in one direction, that’s where you have a problem,” Kyle Welch, an assistant professor of accountancy at George Washington University, told reporters David A. Fahrenthold and Jonathan O’Connell. And, incredibly, the fact that the “errors” were so brazen may work out in Trump’s favor:

. . . in an odd way, Welch said, Trump could be helped by the sheer scale of the exaggerations. They were so far off from reality, Welch wondered whether any real bank or insurer could have been fooled. Welch said he’d never seen a document stretch so far past the normal conventions of accounting. “It’s humorous,” Welch said. “It’s a humorous financial statement.”

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Elizabeth Warren sends another Wells Fargo C.E.O. home in a body bag

On September 20, 2016, Senator Elizabeth Warren publicly disemboweled then-Wells Fargo C.E.O. John Stumpf, telling him during a congressional hearing “you should resign,” owing to his stewardship, or lack thereof, during the firm’s sham-accounts scandal. And less than a month later, he did! While it took it a little longer between Warren tearing Tim Sloan, Stumpf’s successor, a new one, and the announcement that he would be leaving the company, we still think she can add this one to her tally:

 
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After two years at the helm, Wells Fargo C.E.O. Tim Sloan will step down effective immediately. The company’s general counsel Allen Parker will serve as interim C.E.O. while the company searches for a new chief executive.

Here’s a story about Ivanka Trump

It’s from Vicky Ward’s new book, Kushner, Inc., and it sounds about right!

The couple first lived in Jared’s duplex on Astor Place, then moved to a Trump building on Park Avenue and Fifty-ninth Street. They liked to entertain, and still do. . . . Mostly, in the early days of their marriage, their social group consisted of fellow silver-spooners (Rob Speyer, Jamie Johnson, David Lauren), or the older moguls they aspired to be like. It was a very insular and often smug world. At one Astor Place dinner party, Richard Mack found himself sitting next to Blake Lively. Mack is serious-minded; he had absolutely no idea who the Gossip Girl actress was. But he did remember that at one point in the conversation, Ivanka was adamant that “libertarian” and “liberal” were the same thing, and would not be dissuaded. When Mack suggested they look it up, she said, “I’ll take it under advisement.”

Shortly before Kushner, Inc. was released, the Kushner/Trump camp insisted, through a spokesman, that “Every point that Ms. Ward mentioned in what she called her ‘fact-checking’ stage was entirely false,” and that “It seems she has written a book of fiction rather than any serious attempt to get the facts. Correcting everything wrong would take too long and be pointless.”

 

 

 

Donald Trump paid $1.375 million to settle case involving undocumented Polish workers, reveal documents

 

The men were paid to demolish the site where Trump Tower now stands

 
 
 
Investigators want to know what attendees of a Trump Tower meeting with campaign officials discussed in a subsequent meeting
 
Investigators want to know what attendees of a Trump Tower meeting with campaign officials discussed in a subsequent meeting ( Utrecht Robin/action press/REX )

In 1980, under pressure to begin construction on what would become his signature project, Donald Trump employed a crew of 200 undocumented Polish workers who worked in 12-hour shifts, without gloves, hard hats or masks, to demolish the Bonwit Teller building on New York's Fifth Avenue, where the 58-story, golden-hued Trump Tower now stands.

The workers were paid as little as $4 (£3) an hour for their dangerous labour, less than half the union wage, if they got paid at all.

 

Their treatment led to years of litigation over Mr Trump’s labour practices, and in 1998, despite frequent claims that he never settles lawsuits, he quietly reached an agreement to end a class-action suit over the Bonwit Teller demolition in which he was a defendant.

 
 
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For almost 20 years, the terms of that settlement have remained a secret. But last week, the settlement documents were unsealed by Loretta A Preska, a US District Court judge for the Southern District of New York, in response to a 2016 motion filed by Time Inc. and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press. Preska found that the public’s right to know of court proceedings in a class-action case was strengthened by the involvement of the “now-president of the United States.”

 

In a 21-page finding, Preska wrote that “the Trump Parties have failed to identify any interests that can overcome the common law and First Amendment presumptions of access to the four documents at issue.”

 

On the campaign trail and as president, Trump has made curbing immigration one of his top priorities, seeking to close the borders to people from certain Muslim-majority countries and to deport immigrants who are here illegally. The settlement serves as a reminder that as an employer he relied on illegal immigrants to get a dangerous and dirty job done.

 

Katie Townsend, litigation director of the Reporters Committee, called the decision a major victory that goes beyond this one case. “It makes clear that both the First Amendment and common law rights of public access apply to settlement-related documents in class actions,” she said.

Lawyers for Trump were not immediately available for comment.

 
Donald Trump calls Elizabeth Warren 'Pocahontas' in front of Native American veterans

The documents show that Trump paid $1.375 million to settle the case, known as Hardy vs Kaszycki, with $500,000 of it going to a union benefits fund and the rest to pay lawyers’ fees and expenses. According to the documents, one of the union lawyers involved asked the judge to ensure “prompt payment” from Trump, suggesting “within two weeks after the settlement date.”

 

Trump jumped in to object. “Thirty days is normal,” he said.

For the demolition work, Trump hired an inexperienced contractor, William Kaszycki of Kaszycki & Sons, for $775,000 (£585,000). Kaszycki specialized in window and job-site cleaning. His company was renovating an adjoining building for Bonwit Teller, where he employed undocumented Polish workers.

Trump would later testify that he never walked into the adjoining building or noticed the Polish workers. But a foreman on the job, Zbignew Goryn, testified that Trump visited the site, marvelling to him about the Polish crew.

 
 
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“He liked the way the men were working on 57th Street,” Goryn said. “He said, ‘Those Polish guys are good, hard workers.'”

The demolition began in January 1980. It was hard, dirty work, breaking up concrete floors, ripping out electrical wiring and cutting pipes while labouring in a cloud of dust and asbestos.

A smaller group of union demolition workers, who were paid much higher wages and, unlike the Poles, overtime, often made fun of their Polish co-workers, according to the testimony of Adam Mrowiec, one of the Polish labourers. “They told me and my friends that we are stupid Poles and we are working for such low money,” he said.

 

In 1998, Wojciech Kozak described to The New York Times the backbreaking labour on the job.

“We worked in horrid, terrible conditions,” Kozak said. “We were frightened illegal immigrants and did not know enough about our rights.”

Today, Kozak, now 75, lives at the O’Donnell-Dempsey Senior Housing building in Elizabeth, New Jersey.

Activists protest Donald Trump's proposed Muslim ban

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He has blue eyes and a strong handshake, but speaks through a special device because he had a tracheotomy for cancer. He proudly showed off his citizenship papers, dated Nov. 3, 1995.

 

Kozak still recalls the work, and seeing Trump at the site in 1980.

“We were working, 12 to 16 hours a day and were paid $4 an hour,” he said. “Because I worked with an acetylene torch, I got $5 an hour. We worked without masks. Nobody knew what asbestos was. I was an immigrant. I worked very hard.”

But Kaszycki stopped paying the men, and they eventually took their complaints to a lawyer named John Szabo. Szabo went to Thomas Macari, a vice president of the Trump Organization, threatening to place a mechanic’s lien on the property if the men weren’t paid.

Still, there were problems. Szabo filed the lien, prompting Trump to ask for help from Daniel Sullivan, a labour consultant. Sullivan later testified that Trump described his “difficulties,” and “that he had some illegal Polish employees.”

 

Trump, however, testified that he did he not remember that there were undocumented Polish workers on the job, or signing paychecks for the crew. “I really still don’t know that there were illegal aliens,” Trump said on the stand.

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Trump did, according to Szabo, have his lawyer call Szabo with a threat to call Immigration and Naturalization Service to have the men deported.

Szabo got the Labor Department to open a wages-and-hours case for the men, which ultimately won a judgement of $254,000 against Kaszycki.

 

Kaszycki had signed a contract with Local 79 of the House Wreckers Union. But while Kaszycki or Trump paid into the union welfare funds for the handful of union workers on the job, they had not done so for the bulk of the workforce, the undocumented, nonunion Poles.

A union dissident and former boxer, Harry Diduck, brought a case in federal court in 1983 against Kaszycki and, eventually, Trump and others, claiming that Kaszycki, the union president and Trump had colluded to deprive the welfare funds of about $600,000.

A judge ruled that Trump was a legal employer of the Poles, but both sides appealed elements of his decision, with the possibility that the total welfare funds could get reduced to $500,000 (£380,000). On the eve of a second trial, Trump settled.

New York Times

 

 

 

 

Donald Trump Paid $1.4 Million in a Dispute Over Undocumented Workers. Read the Newly Unsealed Legal Papers

 
Here's What President Trump Has Said About DACA in the Past
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NOVEMBER 28, 2017 2:19 PM EST

Donald Trump quietly paid $1.4 million in 1998 to settle a class-action lawsuit that alleged he stiffed a union pension fund by employing undocumented Polish laborers to demolish a department store to make way for Trump Tower.

The amount became public this week after a judge released previously sealed settlement documents in response to a motion filed by Time Inc. and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press in 2016.

“This Order shall remain confidential in accordance with the parties’ agreement at the October 26, 1998 settlement conference,” reads the settlement agreement, which was signed on Dec. 30, 1998, by District Court Judge Thomas P. Griesa of New York’s Southern District.

The case originated in the summer of 1980, when Trump was under pressure to finish the demolition of the Bonwit Teller building on Fifth Avenue in New York City so that he could begin construction on his signature project, the Trump Tower.

As noted in an Aug. 25, 2016, story in TIME, Trump hired a group of undocumented Polish laborers who put in “12-hour shifts with inadequate safety equipment at subpar wages that their contractor paid sporadically, if at all.”

Their hiring led to years-long litigation that Trump finally settled in 1998.

Read the plaintiffs’ memoranda in support of a settlement, the notice of a motion on the case, a transcript of a conference on the settlement and the settlement below.

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Demolition Memorandum in Support by TIME on Scribd

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Demolition Plaintiffs Affidavit by TIME on Scribd

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Demolition Notice of Motion by TIME on Scribd

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Demolition Plaintiffs Memorandum by TIME on Scribd

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Demolition Court Order by TIME on Scribd

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Demolition Legal Settlement by TIME on Scribd

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Demolition Transcript by TIME on Scribd

Donald Trump Bonwit Teller Amended Order by TIME on Scribd

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for letting us know.  :niterider:

 

  • Haha 1

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Fuck this team

I'll tie a frying pan to my ass so you hurt your penis, you ****ing homo!

Shut the fuck up dark cloud pussy

Anyone who is foolish enough to not be a Buffalo Bills fan can go f*ck themselves with a wooden shovel handle.

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also, all that shit in your signature is beyond annoying. just like you.

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